29 April 2022

Week commencing 29 April 1991

The only common theme I can identify from this week in 1991's batch of new chart entries peaking outside the ARIA top 100 is that they are all from artists who are not Australian.
 
Before we take a look at this week's new entries, I have updated some earlier posts with the following:

You may also have missed that I resumed my 1981 Kent Music Report beyond the top 100 recaps this week.  These will posted on Wednesdays.

Wilson Phillips: Australia was not in love with their latest single in 1991.
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 138 "You're in Love" by Wilson Phillips
Peak: number 108
Peak date: 27 May 1991
Weeks in top 150: 7 weeks
Weeks on chart: 10 weeks
 
We last saw Wilson Phillips in December 1990.  "You're in Love" was the fourth single lifted from the group's debut album Wilson Phillips (number 7, July 1990), and gave the girls their third US Billboard Hot 100 number one single in April 1991.  The single also peaked at number 3 in Canada in April 1991, and within the top 30 in the UK and Ireland, the top 40 in the Netherlands and the Flanders region of Belgium, and at number 54 in Germany.

In hindsight, I find it interesting that none of the post-"Hold On" (number 2, July 1990) singles from the Wilson Phillips album dented the top 50 in Australia, and three of the album's singles peaked outside the top 100.  Though, as I wrote last time, the Wilson Phillips sound was probably a bit too squeaky clean for the Australian market, one large hit aside.  Furthermore, I only recall hearing "You're in Love" on the American Top 40 radio show.

We'll next see Wilson Phillips in October 1991.
 
 
 
Number 142 "Stranger Than Fiction" by Joe Jackson
Peak: number 119
Peak date: 1 July 1991
Weeks in top 150: 10 weeks
 
We last saw English singer-songwriter Joe Jackson in July 1989.
 
"Stranger Than Fiction" was the lead single from Joe's eleventh studio album Laughter & Lust (number 57, September 1991).  The single missed the UK top 75, but peaked at number 53 in Germany in June 1991, and at number 71 in the Netherlands in May 1991.

In Australia, "Stranger Than Fiction" took ten weeks to reach its peak in the top 120, and then fell out of the top 150 the following week.

The music video for "Stranger Than Fiction", embedded below, portrays Joe as being totally disinterested in the 'hot' women, typical of those appearing in male artists' music videos around this time, surrounding him.  Perhaps Joe was dropping some not-so-subtle hints about his own sexuality here.

We shall next see Joe in September 1991.


 
Bubbling WAY down under:
 
Number 167 "Can You Dig It?" by The Mock Turtles
Peak: number 167
Peak date: 29 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 1 week 

English band The Mock Turtles formed in Middleton in 1985.  While not their first single in their homeland, "Can You Dig It?" was the band's debut Australian release, lifted from their first studio album Turtle Soup.

Internationally, "Can You Dig It?" peaked at number 18 in the UK in April 1991, and at number 12 in Ireland during the same month.

In Australia, "Can You Dig It?" was most popular in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 151.  This single was the band's only release to chart in Australia, although two further singles were issued: "And Then She Smiles" (released locally in July 1991) and "Strings and Flowers" (November 1991).

In 2002, Vodafone used "Can You Dig It?" in a TV commercial in the UK.  This led to Norman Cook (of Fatboy Slim, Beats International and The Housemartins fame) remixing the track - though rather subtly, as I could barely distinguish the difference at first (it is mainly the percussion).  The remixed version charted in the UK, reaching number 19 in March 2003.

I can't say with certainty, because I cannot find any reference to it online, but I suspect that the guitar riff from this track is sampled (at a different pitch) on a track from another artist we will see in 1992.



Number 170 "Town without Pity" by Stray Cats
Peak: number 170
Peak date: 29 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 1 week

Stray Cats last graced our presence in February 1991.  "Town without Pity" was the third and final single lifted from the band's sixth studio album Let's Go Faster (number 57, March 1991).  As with the previous single, "Town without Pity" was another Australian-only release.  The song is a cover version of a song originally recorded by Gene Pitney in 1961 for the film Town without Pity.

On the ARIA state charts, "Town without Pity" performed strongest in Queensland, where it reached number 141.

We shall next see Stray Cats in 1992.



Number 186 "Easy Come Easy Go" by Winger
Peak: number 186
Peak date: 29 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 1 week

We last saw American metal band Winger in January 1991.

"Easy Come Easy Go" was the third and final single - and second to chart in Australia - from Winger's second studio album In the Heart of the Young (number 135, September 1991).  The single peaked at number 41 on the US Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in March 1991.

Locally, "Easy Come Easy Go" was most popular in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 168.
 
When it comes to metal, I generally prefer the softer, 'power ballad' side as with Winger's previous single.  I hadn't heard this one before, and while it's not something I would seek out, I find it OK.
 
"Easy Come Easy Go" was Winger's final single to chart in Australia.  They had another charting album, however, with their next album Pull peaking at number 164 in August 1993.
 

 
Number 187 "Remember the Day" by Innocence
Peak: number 187
Peak date: 29 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks

We last saw Innocence in February 1991, and here they are with the fifth and final single - and fourth to register a place on the ARIA chart outside the top 100 - from their debut album Belief (number 115, February 1991).
 
"Remember the Day" peaked at number 56 in the band's native UK in March 1991.
 
Within Australia, "Remember the Day" performed strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 169.
 
We will next see Innocence in 1992.
 

 
Next week (6 May): Four new top 150 debuts, although one of these is a song from 1986, and three bubbling WAY down under entries.
 
< Previous week: 22 April 1991                                      Next week: 6 May 1991 >

27 April 2022

Kent Music Report beyond the top 100: 27 April 1981

In September last year, I started re-capping the Predictions for National Top 100 Singles (later 'singles receiving significant sales reports beyond the top 100') lists from the Kent Music Report chart in 1981.  But these lists started publication over four months earlier, in April 1981.  Why did I skip past the first few months?  I just forgot to start writing about them in April 2021, that's all... but now I am playing catch-up.  So, brace yourself as I dust off some early 80s Australian chart flops.
 
Sister Sledge were not the only sister act bubbling under on the Australian chart this week in 1981.
 
Beyond the top 100:
 
Position 6 "I Can't Stand It" by Eric Clapton and His Band
Highest rank: 5th
Peak dates: 4 May 1981 and 11 May 1981
Weeks on below list: 5 weeks
 
Eric Clapton's biggest hit in Australia at this point had been his version of Bob Marley and The Wailers' "I Shot the Sheriff" (number 11, November 1974).  He would go on to land a bigger hit, with his MTV Unplugged acoustic versions of "Tears in Heaven" and "Layla", a double A-side single, reaching number 7 in April 1993 and spending a whopping 41 weeks in the ARIA top 150.
 
"I Can't Stand It" was the lead single from the English guitar maestro's seventh studio album Another Ticket (number 30, April 1981).  While the single did not chart in Eric's native UK, it reached number 7 in Canada in April 1981, and number 10 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in May 1981.

We will next see Eric bubble under in 1987.
 

 
Position 7 "Hello Again" by Neil Diamond
Highest rank: 3rd
Peak date: 11 May 1981
Weeks on below list: 4 weeks

American singer, songwriter, and sometime actor Neil Diamond released his first single in 1962, and his first album in 1966.
 
"Hello Again" was recorded for the soundtrack album to the 1980 movie The Jazz Singer (number 10, March 1981), which was credited as a Neil Diamond release.  Neil also stars in the film.  The single peaked at number 6 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in March 1981, and was a top 40 hit in Ireland, the Netherlands and Belgium.  "Hello Again" also peaked at number 51 in the UK in February 1981.

Although Neil Diamond is a name I am familiar with, I don't actually know much of his music, and I can't say I enjoyed listening to this one.  I had to turn it off half-way through.

Neil will next join us in 1984.



Position 8 "Night Rider" by Kevin Johnson
Highest rank: 8th
Peak dates: 27 April 1981, 4 May 1981 and 11 May 1981
Weeks on below list: 4 weeks

Australian singer Kevin Johnson's first single was released in 1967.  His biggest hit would come in 1973, with "Rock and Roll (I Gave You the Best Years of My Life)", which peaked at number 8 on David Kent's retrospective Australian charts.

This track was lifted from Kevin's fifth studio album Night Rider (number 72, May 1981), which was his last album to chart.  Kevin would, however, have one final charting single, with "Reasons" (number 98, October 1981).



Position 13 "Marching Feet" by MEO 245
Highest rank: 13th
Peak date: 27 April 1981
Weeks on below list: 1 week

Australian band MEO 245 formed in Hobart in 1978.  The group placed two singles on the Kent Music Report top 100 chart, with "Lady Love" (number 43, December 1980) being the biggest of those.

The group only released one album Screen Memory (number 69, August 1981), but curiously, neither "Lady Love" nor "Marching Feet" appear on it.

MEO 245 disbanded in 1983.



Position 14 "Telephone Lines" by Linda George
Highest rank: 11th
Peak date: 11 May 1981
Weeks on below list: 4 weeks
 
English-born Australian singer Linda George, initially known as Miss Linda George, placed six singles on the Australian chart between 1973 and 1980.  The biggest of those was "Mama's Little Girl", which peaked at number 8 in October 1974.

"Telephone Lines" was a non-album release from Linda.  Unfortunately, I can't tell you much about it, as the song does not appear to be available to listen to anywhere online.
 
 
Position 16 "It's My Job" by Jimmy Buffett
Highest rank: 5th
Peak date: 25 May 1981
Weeks on below list: 8 weeks
 
American singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett is one of the richest recording artists, with an estimated wealth of $900 million in 2017.  Despite that, I've never heard of him before... but country music is not my thing.
 
Jimmy's biggest hit in Australia, and his only single to reach the top 40 here, was "Come Monday", which peaked at number 19 in November 1974.

"It's My Job" was lifted from Jimmy's tenth studio album Coconut Telegraph (number 51, April 1981).  The single peaked at number 57 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in March 1981.

We will see Jimmy again in June 1981.
 

 
Position 17 "All American Girls" by Sister Sledge
Highest rank: 14th
Peak date: 11 May 1981
Weeks on below list: 5 weeks
 
American sibling vocal group Sister Sledge formed in 1971.  They landed their first Australian chart hits in 1979 with the disco classics "He's the Greatest Dancer" (number 22, July 1979) and "We Are Family" (number 19, September 1979).  The sisters' biggest hit in Australia, however, came in 1985, when "Frankie" reached number 10 in September of that year.  Aside from these three hits, no other Sister Sledge single peaked higher than number 50 in Australia.

"All American Girls" was the title-track from Sister Sledge's fifth studio album, which did not chart in Australia.  The single peaked at number 79 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in March 1981, number 41 in the UK in March 1981, number 8 in the Netherlands in March 1981, number 6 in the Flanders region of Belgium in April 1981, and number 27 in Germany in April 1981.

I think I've seen this one on a repeat of Countdown during rage retro month before; but I am not certain of that.

Sister Sledge will next bubble under in 1994.
 
 
 
Position 18 "Back of the Woods" by Atla
Highest rank: 18th
Peak dates: 27 April 1981 and 4 May 1981
Weeks on below list: 2 weeks
 
Here's one I'm certain I have seen on a Countdown repeat on rage, as I distinctly recall the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (or 'Mountie') uniforms worn in the video, embedded below.

Atla were an Australian band, and this single was their only "charting" release - of sorts.  It seems the Countdown exposure did not help them.
 
No other release from the band is listed on discogs.com at the time of writing.
 

 
Position 19 "Love You to the Limit" by Cheetah
Highest rank: 9th
Peak dates: 11 May 1981 and 18 May 1981
Weeks on below list: 5 weeks

Cheetah were another Australian band, and another one whose Countdown exposure with this track (a performance of this song from the show is embedded below) did not help its chart success.

Cheetah were fronted by English-born sisters Chrissie and Lindsay Hammond.  The group placed four singles on the Kent Music Report top 100 between 1978 and 1982, with their first hit, "Walking in the Rain" (number 10, November 1978), being their biggest by far.

"Love You to the Limit" was written and produced by Vanda and Young, although obviously they did not give credit for plagiarising the riff from The Troggs' "Wild Thing" from 1966.

Cheetah's only album Rock & Roll Women, which did not chart, contains this song, but not their biggest hit.

"Love You to the Limit" was Cheetah's final Australian chart entry.



Next week (4 May): Three new singles bubbling under the top 100.

                                                                              Next week: 4 May 1981 >

22 April 2022

Week commencing 22 April 1991

Of the then new entries I write about from this week in 1991, six of them did not make the top 40 anywhere that I can ascertain (and none of these are Australian artists).  Before we take a look, I have updated the following earlier posts with the following:
  • 10 April 1989 - a new bubbling WAY down under entry from Tony Llewellyn;
  • 23 October 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entries from Tony Llewellyn and Scary Bill;
 
The Farm: all together in ARIA chart no man's land.
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 118 "Mad About You" by Sting
Peak: number 109
Peak date: 29 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 6 weeks
Weeks on chart: 7 weeks
 
We last saw Sting bubble WAY down under in November 1990.  "Mad About You" was the second single issued from Sting's third solo studio album The Soul Cages (number 3, February 1991).  It followed "All This Time" (number 26, February 1991).

Internationally, "Mad About You" peaked at number 56 in Sting's native UK in March 1991, number 44 in the Netherlands in March 1991, and number 59 in Germany in May 1991.

Within Australia, "Mad About You" performed strongest in Western Australia, where it reached number 80.

I don't recall hearing "Mad About You" before, but, presumably it received some airplay, as Australian FM radio loved Sting and his former band The Police during this period.
 
Few would have predicted that "All This Time" would become Sting's final solo (non-collaboration) top 40 hit in Australia, at the time.

"Mad About You" dented the Australian Music Report top 100 singles chart, peaking at number 95.

We'll next see Sting in June 1991.
 
 
 
Number 122 "Melt in Your Mouth" by Candyman
Peak: number 118
Peak dates: 29 April 1991 and 13 May 1991
Weeks in top 150: 6 weeks
 
American rapper John B. Shaffer III, better known as Candyman, scored a number 9 hit on the US Billboard Hot 100 in November 1990 with "Knockin' Boots", a song I became acquainted with via the American Top 40 radio show.  The single did not perform as well in Australia, peaking at number 58 in January 1991.
 
"Melt in Your Mouth" was the second single from Candyman's debut album Ain't No Shame in My Game (number 142, January 1991).  The single peaked at number 69 in the US in February 1991, and at number 41 in the Netherlands in April 1991.  Candyman effectively became a one-hit wonder, or, in Australia, a not-quite one-hit wonder.

I hadn't heard "Melt in Your Mouth" before.  The song's chorus and melodic hook are lifted from The Spinners' "Could It Be I'm Falling in Love" from 1972.
 
"Melt in Your Mouth" peaked higher on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 94.



Number 140 "Loose Fit" by Happy Mondays
Peak: number 117
Peak date: 6 May 1991
Weeks in top 150: 10 weeks
Weeks on chart: 10 weeks

We last saw English band Happy Mondays in August 1990.  "Loose Fit" was the third single lifted from the band's third studio album Pills 'n' Thrills and Bellyaches (number 98, March 1991).
 
"Loose Fit" peaked at number 17 the UK in March 1991, and at number 71 in the Netherlands in May 1991.  It's interesting (or so I think) how the peak positions for "Loose Fit" in various countries are all combinations of the numbers one and seven.

Domestically, "Loose Fit" performed strongest in South Australia/Northern Territory, where it reached number 53.

I have heard "Loose Fit" before, and like it, but could not remember how the song went until listening to it again to write this post.

Owing to the Gulf War taking place in early 1991, the "Gonna buy an airforce base, gonna wipe out your race" lyric was edited out of "Loose Fit" for the single's release in the UK.  I remember reading about sillier censorship decisions by the BBC around the time of the Gulf War, such as banning Bangles' "Walk Like an Egyptian" (number 1, February 1987).  That's the kind of censorship you might expect from the US.

Happy Mondays will join us next in 1992.



Number 142 "All Together Now" by The Farm
Peak: number 102
Peak date: 6 May 1991
Weeks in top 150: 7 weeks

English band The Farm last graced us with their presence in January 1991.  "All Together Now" was the second single from the band's first studio album Spartacus (number 106, May 1991).
 
An early version of "All Together Now", titled "No Man's Land", was written after the band's singer Peter Hooton, who had trained as a history teacher, read an article about the unofficial Christmas truce between British and German soldiers during the first World War in 1914.  The troops ditched their weapons to play a game of football on 'no man's land', the space between their trenches.  The song was performed live on John Peel's Radio 1 show in 1983.  When recording the song in 1990, producer Suggs (from Madness) suggested the chorus lyric should be "all together now".  The song interpolates German baroque composer Johann Pachelbel's "Canon in D".
 
The single peaked at number 4 in the UK in December 1990, number 9 in the Netherlands in February 1991, number 13 in the Flanders region of Belgium in February 1991, number 5 in Germany in March 1991, and number 18 in Switzerland in April 1991.
 
"All Together Now" crept into the Australian Music Report top 100 singles chart, peaking at number 96.
 
I don't recall hearing "All Together Now" in 1991, but became familiar with the song via a 1995 happy hardcore cover version from German eurodance band Intermission.

We will see The Farm again in 1992.



Number 149 "Temple of Love"  by Harriet
Peak: number 149
Peak date: 22 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 1 week

Here's one I had never heard of before.  Harriet, whose full name is Harriet Roberts, is a soul singer from Sheffield in the UK.  Interestingly, this track was her only release to dent the UK top 100, spending a solitary week at number 100 in August 1990.

"Temple of Love" was lifted from the album Woman to Man; Harriet's only album release.  A much dancier version of the track, which I prefer, was released as the single version in Germany and Japan.

Bizarrely, "Temple of Love" was released in Australia in October 1990, taking six months to scrape into the top 150.  In the interim, Harriet released another single locally, "Woman to Man", in January 1991, but it missed the top 150.



Number 150 "Funk Boutique" by The Cover Girls
Peak: number 150
Peak date: 22 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 1 week
Weeks on chart: 3 weeks

The only song by New York-based freestyle group The Cover Girls I had heard before is one that we will see in 1992.

"Funk Boutique", which is quite sparse in lyrics, appears to have been an in-between albums release that was eventually included on the group's third studio album Here It Is (number 236, September 1992) in 1992.

"Funk Boutique" peaked at number 55 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in March 1991.

Domestically, "Funk Boutique" was most popular in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 144.

The Cover Girls will make their second and final appearance on the ARIA singles chart in 1992.



Bubbling WAY down under:

Number 154 "All I Want Is You" by Surface
Peak: number 154
Peak date: 22 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 1 week

You can tell from the first few seconds of this track that it's going to be a slickly-produced r&b lurve ballad... and that's exactly what it is, listening to this track for the first time.

Surface last 'surfaced' (ho ho) on the ARIA top 150 in February 1991.  "All I Want Is You" was another single from the group's third studio album 3 Deep (number 146, April 1991).
 
Surprisingly, "All I Want Is You" did not chart on the US Billboard Hot 100.  It did, however, reach number 8 on the US Billboard R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart in April 1991... for what that's worth.
 
Locally, "All I Want Is You" was most successful in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 147.

"All I Want Is You" would be Surface's last single to chart in Australia.



Number 158 "G.L.A.D." by Kim Appleby
Peak: number 158
Peak date: 22 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks

We first saw Kim Appleby in January 1991.  "G.L.A.D.", short for good lovin' and devotion, was the second single lifted from Kim's debut solo album Kim Appleby (number 159, April 1991).  The song was co-written with Kim's late sister Melanie, who was the other half of Mel & Kim, and Craig Logan, the former Bros member who Kim was dating at this time.

G.L.A.D. was going to be the title of Mel & Kim's second album, which never eventuated, following F.L.M. (number 2, August 1987) and sticking with the alphabet letters theme.  Kim launched her solo career nine months after Mel's passing in January 1990.  She was driven to showcase the songs she and Mel had written during Mel's illness, as a tribute to her sister.

"G.L.A.D." was remixed from the original album version for its single release by Phil Harding and Ian Curnow, the B-team at Stock Aitken Waterman (who produced the F.L.M. album).  The track features a rap from Aswad's Brinsley Ford.

Internationally, "G.L.A.D." reached number 10 in the UK in February 1991, number 7 in Ireland, number 6 in the Flanders region of Belgium in April 1991, and top 20 in Germany, the Netherlands and Switzerland.

Within Australia, "G.L.A.D." performed strongest in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 138.

Unlike Kim's previous single, I heard "G.L.A.D." at the time, catching the video on Channel 10's short-lived Coca-Cola Power Cuts as a new release.

A third single from the Kim Appleby album, "Mama", was released in Australia in June 1991, but failed to chart.  It did, however, give Kim a third and final solo top 20 hit in the UK, peaking at number 19 there in July 1991.

A fourth single, "If You Cared", was issued from the album in the UK in October 1991, but did not receive a local release.  Mel & Kim performed a live a cappella excerpt from "If You Cared" in their April 1988 interview on UK TV show Wogan.

We shall see Kim Appleby again in 1993.



Number 180 "Now That We've Found Love" by Love in Effect featuring Jazzie B
Peak: number 180
Peak date: 22 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks
 
This track is a cover version of The O'Jays' "Now That We've Found Love" from 1973.   Another version of the song, by Heavy D. & The Boyz, peaked at number 6 in Australia in September 1991.

Love in Effect was an ensemble of artists who came together to release this single and nothing else.  I assume the track was recorded for charity, as these things usually are, but cannot find any evidence of such.
 
The artists featured in Love in Effect include Soul II Soul's Jazzie B (the only one to receive a featuring credit), Ben Vopeliere-Pierrot from Curiosity Killed the Cat, Ruby Turner, Diana Brown and Barry K. Sharpe, The Wee Papa Girl Rappers, Jeninne Levy, and Jay Williamson.

This version of "Now That We've Found Love" missed the UK top 75, and peaked at number 80 in the Netherlands in March 1991.  The single was most-successful in New Zealand, where it reached number 25 in May 1991.

Within Australia, "Now That We've Found Love" performed strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 167.



Number 191 "Don't Hold Back Your Love" by Daryl Hall & John Oates
Peak: number 161
Peak date: 29 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 5 weeks

We last saw Daryl Hall & John Oates in December 1990, with the lead single from the duo's fourteenth studio album Change of Season (number 137, February 1991).  "Don't Hold Back Your Love" was the second and final single released from the album in Australia.

Internationally, "Don't Hold Back Your Love" peaked at number 41 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in February 1991.

In Australia, "Don't Hold Back Your Love" performed strongest in Western Australia, where it reached number 108.

Australian singer Daryl Braithwaite would go on to score a bigger 'hit' with this song later in 1991.  His version of "Don't Hold Back Your Love" peaked at number 55 in October 1991, and spent 23 weeks on the chart.

As it is unlikely I will be writing these chart recaps by the time it gets to 2010 (as my interest in new music drops off sharply by the turn of the century), I can reveal now that Hall and Oates landed one further charting single in Australia - "You Make My Dreams", which originally peaked at number 40 in October 1981, re-entered the ARIA singles chart in March 2010, peaking at number 106 during the same month.  Despite the low peak, "You Make My Dreams" has gone on to spend 167 weeks on the chart and has been certified triple platinum by ARIA in December 2019.  Don't you just love these anomalies of the streaming era?

We will next see Daryl Hall, sans John Oates, in 1994.



Next week (29 April): Two top 150 debuts and four bubbling WAY down under entries.  Also, my 1981 Kent Music Report beyond the top 100 recaps will resume on Wednesday (27 April) next week.

< Previous week: 15 April 1991                                         Next week: 29 April 1991 >

15 April 2022

Week commencing 15 April 1991

One thing all of this week in 1991's debuts that peaked outside the top 100 have in common is that I didn't hear any of them at the time.  Did you?

Before we take a look at this week's debuts, I have updated the following earlier post:
  • 11 March 1991 - a new bubbling WAY down under entry from Hard-Ons.
 
Vanilla Ice showing us how many hits he had with his fingers.
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 107 "I Love You"/"Stop That Train" by Vanilla Ice
Peak: number 103
Peak date: 22 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks
Weeks on chart: 5 weeks
 
Robert Van Winkle, better known as Vanilla Ice, burst onto the scene in late 1990 with  "Ice Ice Baby" (number 1, January 1991), a song that is still fairly well-known today, with over 400 million views on YouTube.

Nothing else 'Vanilla' released performed nearly as well, however, and he is largely thought of as (inaccurately) being a one-hit wonder.  He had a second top 20 hit in Australia with "Play That Funky Music" (number 13, March 1991).
 
The album housing both of the above hits, To the Extreme (number 9, March 1991), is reported to have sold 15 million copies worldwide.  Vanilla's second studio album, 1994's Mind Blowin', in contrast, failed to chart anywhere in the world.  That is some fall from grace!
 
Vanilla was already in trouble by the time of his third single, the double A-side "I Love You"/"Stop That Train".  I didn't hear either track at the time.  The imaginatively-titled "I Love You" was a rather basic 'lurve' ballad, with chorus lyrics "I love you... 'cause I love you."
 
Why the sudden sharp decline in Vanilla's popularity?  I think there were a several factors: Vanilla came across as cocky in interviews, his record label created a false biography of Vanilla's upbringing without his knowledge, and Vanilla made some stupid statements - like denying that he had ever heard Queen and David Bowie's "Under Pressure" (number 6, December 1981), which "Ice Ice Baby" heavily sampled.  Vanilla was also not perceived as being an authentic hip-hop artist, being white, not from 'the hood', and due to the commercial nature of his music.  A backlash ensued.
 
Furthermore, some curious career decisions were made for Vanilla, releasing a live rap album (whoever bought one of those?) in 1991, and taking a lead acting role in Cool As Ice.  The movie was critically panned and recouped only 20% of its production costs at the box office.  It seemed like there was a scattergun approach trying to replicate and cash-in on the success of "Ice Ice Baby" and To the Extreme, without much forethought.  Nothing Vanilla tried worked.

"I Love You"/"Stop That Train" also under-performed internationally, peaking at number 52 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in March 1991, number 27 in Ireland in March 1991, number 45 in the UK in April 1991, number 65 in Germany in April 1991, number 39 in the Netherlands in May 1991, and number 30 in New Zealand in May 1991.

Within Australia, "I Love You"/"Stop That Train" performed strongest in Queensland, where it reached number 70.  The single peaked at number 93 on the Australian Music Report top 100 singles chart.

Vanilla will join us next in December 1991.
 
 

 
Number 125 "Headlong" by Queen
Peak: number 119
Peak date: 22 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks
Weeks on chart: 5 weeks

We last saw veteran English band Queen in April 1990.  Three of the five singles from their 1989 album The Miracle (number 4, June 1989) peaked outside the ARIA top 100, and two of the four singles lifted from Queen's fourteenth studio album Innuendo (number 6, February 1991) would do the same.

"Headlong" was the lead single from Innuendo in the US, released in January 1991.  In the band's native UK, "Headlong" was issued as the album's third release.  In Australia, "Headlong" was the second single from the album, following "Innuendo" (number 28, February 1991).

Internationally, "Headlong" peaked at number 25 in Ireland in May 1991, number 14 in the UK in June 1991, and number 43 in the Netherlands in June 1991.

Locally, "Headlong" performed strongest in Western Australia, where it reached number 78.

I hadn't heard or seen the video for "Headlong" until now.  My thoughts are that, again, Freddie looks rather gaunt in it, though he still had enough stamina to give an energetic performance.
 
We shall next see Queen in a mere six weeks' time.

 
 
Number 137 "Wilbury Twist" by Traveling Wilburys
Peak: number 137
Peak date: 15 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 6 weeks

Traveling Wilburys last graced our presence in February 1991.

"Wilbury Twist" was issued as the third single from the band's second album, the misleadingly-titled Vol. 3 (number 14, November 1990).
 
As with their previous single, the only other country "Wilbury Twist" charted in was Canada, where it reached number 86.
 
Actor John Candy makes an appearance in the music video.

"Wilbury Twist" was Traveling Wilburys' final single.



Number 146 "Over Rising" by The Charlatans
Peak: number 146
Peak date: 15 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 1 week
 
We saw The Charlatans back in November 1990.  "Over Rising" was the first of two in-between-album singles issued by the band between their debut album Some Friendly (number 79, January 1991) and its follow-up Between 10th and 11th.
 
"Over Rising" peaked at number 15 in the band's native UK in March 1991, and at number 7 in Ireland during the same month.

I hadn't heard this one before, and don't mind it.



Number 147 "Pick Up the Pace 1990" by Young MC
Peak: number 147
Peak dates: 15 April 1991, 22 April 1991 and 29 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks
Weeks on chart: 6 weeks

Like Vanilla Ice this week in 1991, Young MC was struggling to have hits following his belated Australian number one single "Bust a Move" (number 1, October 1990).  Young's other 'hits' in Australia, "Principal's Office" (number 50, May 1990), and "I Come Off" (number 43, January 1991) missed the top 40.
 
"Pick Up the Pace" was released as the final single from Young MC's debut album Stone Cold Rhymin' (number 38, October 1990), although it had a major overhaul from the original album version - hence the addition of '1990' to the title.

The music video for "Pick Up the Pace 1990" was made up of outtakes from Young's earlier videos.  The only other country the single charted in was New Zealand, where it reached number 38 in May 1991.

On the ARIA state charts, "Pick Up the Pace 1990" peaked highest in Queensland, where it reached number 123.

We will next see Young MC in 1992.



Number 148 "I'll Give All My Love to You" by Keith Sweat
Peak: number 148
Peak date: 15 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 1 week
Weeks on chart: 3 weeks

Five years before landing his first top 100 entry on the Australian singles chart with "Twisted" (number 9, January 1997), American r&b/soul singer Keith Sweat bubbled under with "I'll Give All My Love to You", the second single and title track from the album I'll Give All My Love to You, which did not chart in Australia.  Interestingly, Keith's next album Keep It Comin' (number 147, February 1992) did chart in Australia, but no singles released from it did.

"I'll Give All My Love to You" peaked at number 7 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in February 1991.  I probably heard the song on the American Top 40 radio program at the time, but have no recollection of it.  I don't normally listen to this sort of music, but rather enjoyed this track, to my surprise.

On the ARIA state charts, "I'll Give All My Love to You" peaked highest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 134.

Keith will next join us in 1994.



Number 150 "Together Forever" by Lisette Melendez
Peak: number 106
Peak date: 3 June 1991
Weeks in top 150: 14 weeks
Weeks on chart: 15 weeks

Another song I probably heard on American Top 40 but have no recollection of (what was I doing in early 1991?!) is "Together Forever" by American freestyle singer Lisette Melendez.  The single peaked at number 35 on the US Billboard Hot 100, and was the title track from Lisette's debut album Together Forever (number 199, December 1991).
 
Within Australia, "Together Forever" performed much stronger on the New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory state chart, where it reached number 56, than in any other state.  In contrast, the single peaked no higher than number 107, in South Australia/Northern Territory, on any of the other four state charts.
 
"Together Forever" also peaked much higher on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 55.

The production on "Together Forever" sounds rather similar to Corina's "Temptation" (number 57, October 1991) from later in 1991.  Both tracks were produced by Carlos "After Dark" Berrios, which explains the similarity.

Lisette never landed a top 100 single or album in Australia, but we will see her bubble under on two further occasions, with the next one being in November 1991.



Bubbling WAY down under:

Number 153 "Sensible Shoes" by David Lee Roth
Peak: number 153
Peak dates: 15 April 1991 and 27 May 1991
Weeks on chart: 4 weeks (probably - see below for explanation)

David Lee Roth rose to fame as the lead singer in Van Halen, who landed a major hit in Australia with "Jump" (number 2, March 1984).  David quit the group to embark on a solo career in August 1985, following a dispute over the direction of the band's music.

While still part of Van Halen, David launched his solo career with a cover version of The Beach Boys' "California Girls" (number 6, March 1985).  David's post-Van Halen solo career was launched in 1986, with the single "Yankee Rose" (number 33, August 1986) and album Eat 'em and Smile (number 26, August 1986).
 
David's third solo album A Little Ain't Enough (number 26, February 1991) appeared in early 1991, led by the almost-title track "A Lil' Ain't Enough" (number 42, February 1991).  David's brand of 'hair metal', with expensive, over-the-top music videos, was definitely on the way out, commercially, in early 1991, leading to the rise of alternative and grunge music.  Perhaps the music video for "Sensible Shoes", the second single from A Little Ain't Enough, was tapping into the changing styles, being shot in black and white and toning down most of David's theatrics.  The song also has a bluesier, gritter sound than typical of David's earlier singles.

Internationally, "Sensible Shoes" peaked at number 48 in Canada, and number 81 in the UK in March 1991.

Domestically, "Sensible Shoes" performed strongest in Queensland, where it reached number 125.

You may be wondering why I've noted "probably" beside number of weeks this single spent on the Australian chart.  The reason for this is that ARIA have (erroneously, I believe) listed David's 1988 single "Stand Up" as charting for one week at number 153 (the same position "Sensible Shoes" had reached) at the end of May 1991.  As that 1988 single, which did not chart in Australia, was not re-issued in 1991, it has to be a mistake.  So, I have added one week to the 3 week tally for this single on the ARIA database.

We shall next see David in 1994.



Number 166 "My Head's in Mississippi" by ZZ Top
Peak: number 166
Peak date: 15 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 1 week

We last saw ZZ Top in November 1990.  "My Head's in Mississippi" was issued as the third single from the band's tenth studio album Recycler (number 27, November 1990).

"My Head's in Mississippi" peaked at number 37 in the UK in April 1991.  I cannot find evidence of it charting elsewhere.

On the ARIA state charts, "My Head's in Mississippi" performed strongest in Queensland, where it reached number 144.

We will next see ZZ Top in 1992.



Number 180 "Seven Little Girls (Sitting in the Back Seat)" by Bombalurina featuring Timmy Mallett
Peak: number 180
Peak date: 15 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks

And now for the silliest new entry of the week... but silly can be good, right?

Bombalurina was a joint project between Andrew Lloyd Webber (!) and Nigel Wright.  They roped in female singers and dancers Dawn Andrews and Annie Dunkley (you might recognise the latter from Sinitta's "Right Back Where We Started From" music video), as well as UK children's TV presenter Timmy Mallett (he's the guy driving the car in the video embedded below).  The group's name was taken from a character in Lloyd Webber's stage musical Cats.

The group released a version of "Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny Yellow Polka Dot Bikini" (number 66, January 1991), which topped the UK singles chart for three weeks in August/September 1990.  It also reached number 1 in Ireland, and was a top 10 hit in Germany, Austria, Norway and New Zealand.

"Seven Little Girls...", the follow-up release, was another cover version, this time telling the story of seven "little girls" who are busy "having fun in the back seat" with a guy called Fred, while the song's narrator is relegated to driving.  Just the sort of novelty record to aim at a young TV audience...  The song was originally recorded by Paul Evans in 1959.

While "Seven Little Girls..." did not perform as well as its predecessor, it was, of course, another hit in the UK, reaching number 18 there in December 1990.  The single also peaked at number 26 in Ireland during the same month.

An album, Huggin' an'a Kissin', with its title taken from "Seven Little Girls...", was released in Australia in March 1991, with 'Non Stop Party' and 'Singalong Karaoke' versions issued the following month.  None of these charted in Australia.

I didn't know this song at the time, but think it's quite an earworm, despite obviously being disposable (or perhaps because of that).  One thing I am shocked to learn, when I researched for my post this week, is that Timmy Mallett was only 35 when this was released.  He seems much older to me in the music video.



Next week (22 April): Six new top 150 debuts and four bubbling WAY down under entries.

< Previous week: 8 April 1991                                     Next week: 22 April 1991 >

08 April 2022

Week commencing 8 April 1991

Four of this week in 1991's debuting singles that peaked in the 101-150 region of the chart spent at least seven weeks in the top 150, which is above the 1991 average of 5.65 weeks.
 
I have updated another earlier post with the following:
  • 19 June 1989 - a new bubbling WAY down under entry from Z'Zi Labor.
 
Collette: this wouldn't be everlasting chart success.
  
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 133 "This Will Be (Everlasting Love)" by Collette
Peak: number 122
Peak date: 29 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 9 weeks
Weeks on chart: 9 weeks
 
New-Zealand born Collette Roberts started her career as a fashion model, appearing on the cover of Dolly magazine in 1983.  She launched a recording career in 1989 with an acid-house inspired cover version of Anita Ward's "Ring My Bell", which reached number 5 in May 1989 and was certified gold.  Collette's iconic bike shorts and fluorescent lycra image in the video for "Ring My Bell" became closely associated with her, and bike shorts are one of the first things most people who grew up in the 80s would think of when the name 'Collette' is mentioned.

After the initial success of "Ring My Bell", Collette copped a lot of flak and was almost universally panned by critics for her her image, lack of technical vocal ability, and because she was a model who scored a big hit with a cover version.  Australian radio was also stuck in classic/pub rock hell at this point in time, and would not touch dance or female pop music with a barge pole.

Often inaccurately referred to as a one-hit wonder, Collette followed up "Ring My Bell" with two further top 40 hits, which she co-wrote, "All I Wanna Do Is Dance" (number 12, July 1989) and "That's What I Like About You" (number 31, November 1989).  Collette's debut album Raze the Roof (number 48, November 1989) was a moderate success, denting the top 50.

After a gap of nine months, Collette returned in 1990 with a radically different image.  Gone were the bike shorts and bright colours; in was a short hair cut and lots of dark clothes.  Collette co-wrote her next single, "Who Do You Think You Are" (number 56, August 1990) as a response to her many critics.  Unfortunately, it was not a major success.  A cover version of Diana Ross' "Upside Down" (number 91, January 1991) was released as its follow-up, but fared even worse on the charts.

Collette's second album Attitude (number 107, April 1991) was preceded by another single, "This Will Be (Everlasting Love)".  Despite sharing a similar title, the song is not a cover version of Natalie Cole's "This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)" (number 28, February 1976), but is an original, written by Collette and Southern Sons' Peter Bowman.
 
"This Will Be (Everlasting Love)" performed strongest in South Australia/Northern Territory, where it reached number 94.  The single would become Collette's final solo release.  She then briefly ventured into acting, appearing in two episodes of Home and Away in 1991 as Constable Nick Parrish's date, and then became a make-up artist.  In 2006, Collette appeared on an episode of Where Are They Now?, revealing that she also volunteers at Sydney's Taronga Zoo.

Despite Collette's solo recording career ending in 1991, we will see her again as a featured artist in 1995.
 

 
Number 134 "Spit in the Rain" by Del Amitri
Peak: number 118
Peak date: 15 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 7 weeks
Weeks on chart: 10 weeks

Scottish band Del Amitri formed in Glasgow in the early 1980s.  Despite claims that the band name is Greek for "from the womb", the name Del Amitri is essentially meaningless.

Del Amitri released their first, self-titled, album in 1985, but it was not a commercial success.  After a four-year gap, their second album Waking Hours (number 8, June 1990), was released in Europe in 1989.  The album's lead single, "Kiss This Thing Goodbye" (number 28, June 1990), became a sleeper hit, taking seven-and-a-half months to reach its peak in Australia and spending 41 weeks on the chart.  Surprisingly, "Kiss This Thing Goodbye" was a bigger hit in Australia than in the band's home country, where it only reached number 43 in March 1990 after initially peaking at number 59 in August 1989.

"Kiss This Thing Goodbye" was followed-up, in Australia, by "Nothing Ever Happens" (number 46, June 1990) - my favourite Del Amitri song, and "Stone Cold Sober" (number 50, September 1990).  A fourth single from Waking Hours, "Move Away Jimmy Blue", was released locally in November 1990, but did not chart.
 
"Spit in the Rain" was an in-between albums single that did not appear on any of Del Amitri's studio albums until an expanded 2-CD re-issue of Waking Hours was released in 2014.
 
Internationally, "Spit in the Rain" peaked at number 21 in the UK in November 1990.

Within Australia, "Spit in the Rain" performed strongest on the South Australia/Northern Territory state chart, where it reached number 78.
 
We shall next see Del Amitri in 1995.
 

 
Number 139 "More Than a Girlfriend" by No Justice
Peak: number 121
Peak date: 20 May 1991
Weeks in top 150: 9 weeks
 
Australian band No Justice only released two singles, 1990's "Lately" (number 91, August 1990), and this one, which does not appear to be available to listen to anywhere online at the time of writing this.  It doesn't help that "More Than a Girlfriend" was only issued on vinyl and cassette, so sourcing a digital rip would not be easy.

Despite the band's lack of chart success, "Lately" managed to land heavy rotation on Home and Away at the time, and the band even appeared 'live' performing the song in an episode.
 
The drummer in No Justice was Countdown Revolution host Chook (real name Andrew Chalhoub), who sadly passed away in 2018 - something I was not aware of until researching this song for my post this week.  Before discovering this fact, I made the mistake of sending Chook a message on facebook (it was not apparent that he had died from his public profile) to ask if he had a copy of either the music video or an audio clip of this song...   Instead, all I can post here is an image of the single sleeve.

I probably heard this song at the time, but cannot recall how it goes.
 
 
 
Number 140 "How Much Is Enough" by The Fixx
Peak: number 119
Peak date: 29 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 8 weeks 

We last saw English band The Fixx in April 1989.  "How Much Is Enough" was the lead single from the band's sixth studio album Ink.
 
Internationally, "How Much Is Enough" peaked at number 35 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in May 1991, where it was The Fixx's first US top 40 single since 1986.  The single missed the top 75 in the band's native UK.

I hadn't heard this song before, but liked it - particularly the chorus.
 
 
 
Number 150 "Shakin the Cage" by The Zoo featuring Mick Fleetwood and Billy Thorpe
Peak: number 142 
Peak date: 15 April 1991
Weeks in top 150: 3 weeks
 
Regular readers of my posts may know how much it irks me when an artist does not have a consistent name (e.g. The vs. no 'The' at the start of a band name) across their releases.  But a more egregious offence than that is when apostrophes are missing... and I say that as a Shakespear(')s Sister fan.  Here we have a song title that contains the word "Shakin", with no apostrophe used on the single's artwork.  Ugh.

Another dumb thing about this release is that The Zoo is a Mick Fleetwood of Fleetwood Mac side project, yet he is credited as a featured artist here.  Australian Billy Thorpe is also a member of the group, but is similarly credited as a featured artist.  The only explanation I can think of as to why this occurred is that the general public didn't know who The Zoo were, but might know of Mick Fleetwood or Billy Thorpe.

As if the above wasn't bad enough, The Zoo was credited as Mick Fleetwood's Zoo on their debut 1983 album I'm Not Me, but are listed as The Zoo on the band's second album, 1992's Shakin' the Cage - note correct use of the apostrophe.  Billy Thorpe wrote eight of the album's ten tracks, and co-wrote the other two.

As someone who wasn't aged over 40 in 1991, I'd never heard of this, or Mick Fleetwood's Zoo.  Listening to "Shakin the Cage" now, it's just the kind of thing you'd expect Triple M to have added to their playlist in 1991.  Decent enough music for long drives through the countryside, but that's about it.
 
 
 
Bubbling WAY down under:
 
Number 160 "Secret Love" by Bee Gees
Peak: number 158
Peak date: 29 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 6 weeks
 
Bee Gees had three singles that peaked outside the ARIA top 100 in 1989, and we last saw the group in October 1989.
 
"Secret Love", the lead single from the group's nineteenth studio album High Civilization (number 126, June 1991), was the fourth in a string of seven Bee Gees singles to peak outside the Australian top 100 between 1989 and 1995.  The group would not trouble the ARIA top 100 singles chart again until 1997.
 
Internationally, "Secret Love" was a top 10 hit in Austria, Belgium, Germany, Ireland and the UK.
 
Within Australia, "Secret Love" was most popular in Western Australia, where it reached number 129.
.
We will next see Bee Gees in 1993.
 

 
Number 167 "Family Affair" by Stephen Cummings
Peak: number 167
Peak date: 8 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks
 
Australian singer-songwriter and jingle-writer Stephen Cummings last graced our presence in August 1989.  Stephen's biggest solo hit on the Australian charts was "Gymnasium" (number 27, September 1984), while his biggest hit with his former group The Sports was "How Come" (number 21, July 1981).

"Family Affair", a cover version of Sly & The Family Stone, was the second single lifted from Stephen's fifth studio album Good Humour (number 40, March 1991). It followed "Hell (You've Put Me Through)" (number 33, February 1991), which was Stephen's final top 40 hit.

On the state charts, "Family Affair" was most-successful in Western Australia, where it reached number 151.

We shall next see Stephen in June 1991.
 

 
Number 170 "Found Love" by Double Dee featuring Dany
Peak: number 170
Peak date: 8 April 1991 
Weeks on chart: 6 weeks (1991 and 1996 chart-runs combined)

Double Dee were an Italian studio boffin act, and they roped in singer Dany (real name Donato Losito) to provide vocals on this track.

Internationally, "Found Love" peaked at number 38 in the Netherlands in October 1990, number 40 in the Flanders region of Belgium in November 1990, number 23 in France in November 1990, and number 63 in the UK in December 1990.

Confusing matters on the Australian chart, both the original version of "Found Love" and a 1995 remix that was released as a single are combined into the same entry on the ARIA database.  "Found Love" peaked in 1991 on two of the state charts (New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory and Queensland), and in 1996 on the remaining three state charts.  While I unfortunately cannot give you a national Australian chart peak for the 1996 release of this track (as it missed the top 150), I can tell you that it was not higher than number 170, and that it performed strongest in South Australia/Northern Territory, where it reached number 120 in March 1996.

Double Dee will bubble under again on the Australian chart in 2003.



Number 175 "Out of My Mind" by Soho
Peak: number 156
Peak date: 22 April 1991
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks

Twin sisters Jacqui and Pauline Cuff, together with producer Timothy London, form Soho.  The group released two singles in Australia in the late 1980s that failed to chart: "Piece of You" (May 1998) and "Message from My Baby" (April 1989).

"Hippychick" (number 21, January 1991), which prominently samples The Smiths' "How Soon Is Now", gave Soho their first - and only real - hit, peaking at number 8 in the UK upon re-release in January 1991, and narrowly missing the top 20 in Australia.

"Out of My Mind" was the second single lifted from Soho's second album Goddess (number 102, January 1991) in Australia.  It was also a single in the US, though the UK went with "Love Generation".
 
On the ARIA state charts, "Out of My Mind" performed strongest in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 145.
 
Soho returned with a new single "Ride" in 1992.  Although I caught the video for "Ride" as a new release on rage, the single does not actually appear to have been released in Australia.

"Out of My Mind" was Soho's last single to chart in Australia.
 

 
Next week (15 April): Seven little* top 150 debuts and three bubbling WAY down under entries (*this comment will make sense next week).
 
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