25 May 2024

Week commencing 25 May 1992

Before diving into this week's posts, I wish to pay tribute to regular blog reader Brad Niemann, who suddenly and unexpectedly passed away on 13 May 2024.  Brad is responsible for obtaining about half of the 'bubbling WAY down under' peaks outside the top 150 I include in my blog posts, which is why some of these songs/artists are new to me.  Brad and I crossed paths almost a decade ago, and we shared an interest in low-charting/'flop' singles.  While there was some overlap in our musical tastes, Brad was more into metal/rock than I am (I am generally more into dance/pop/indie), and so our tastes complemented each other.  This blog would showcase a less-diverse range of artists without Brad's input.  He will be greatly missed.
 
I have updated some previous posts with newly-uncovered bubbling WAY down under entries:
 
* 26 June 1989 - two new bubbling WAY down under entries from Etta James; 
* 13 November 1989 - a new bubbling WAY down under entry from Guy Pearce
 
This week in 1992 sees a bunch of new entries for which I can identify no common theme, so let's just dive straight in...
 
Kenny Loggins' hair in 1992 definitely belonged in the "danger zone".
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 114 "Time to Make You Mine" by Lisa Stansfield
Peak: number 114
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks
Weeks on chart: 9 weeks

We last saw English songstress Lisa Stansfield in 1990.
 
"Time to Make You Mine" was the third single lifted from Lisa's second solo album Real Love (number 40, January 1992), following "Change" (number 21, November 1991) and "All Woman" (number 52, March 1992).
 
Internationally, "Time to Make You Mine" peaked at number 14 in the UK, number 33 in Switzerland, number 47 in the Netherlands, and number 47 in the Flanders region of Belgium - all in April 1992.

Domestically, "Time to Make You Mine" performed strongest in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 86.
 
I caught the video for "Time to Make You Mine" once on rage as a new release, before the top 60 chart run started.  That was the only time I heard or saw the song at the time.  I can't place my finger on it, but "Time to Make You Mine" reminds me of another song, musically.
 
We will next see Lisa in July 1992.



Number 120 "Never Look Back" by Maybe Dolls
Peak: number 114
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 8 weeks
Weeks on chart: 11 weeks
 
We saw Australian band The Numbers, formed by siblings Annalisse and Chris Morrow bubble under in 1981.  The pair formed Maybe Dolls in 1991, with Annalisse still on lead vocals.  Maybe Dolls landed two top 40 hits in Australia, with their debut single "Nervous Kid" (number 32, December 1991), and its follow-up  "Cool Jesus" (number 31, March 1992).
 
"Never Look Back" was the third single lifted from the band's debut, and only, album Propaganda (number 25, March 1992).
 
On the state charts, "Never Look Back" was most popular in Western Australia, where it reached number 48.
 
I don't recall hearing this one at the time.  Front woman Annalisse hosted an episode of the iconic Australian music TV show Countdown in 1982, which re-aired during rage retro month a few years back - and it's worth checking out for her general awkwardness in hosting, along with her iconic early 80s hair-do.

We'll see Maybe Dolls one more time, in November 1992.



Number 147 "Everybody Pump" by DJ Power
Peak: number 147
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 1 week
 
I've never heard of this one before, and am listening to it for the first time as I write this post.  My first thought is that the chant during the opening is very similar, if not virtually identical, to that which appears at the start of 2 In a Room's "Wiggle It" (number 3, March 1991).
 
Internationally, "Everybody Pump" peaked at number 46 in the UK in March 1992. 

I can't tell you much else about this one, other than the man behind DJ Power is Italian DJ and producer Stefano Gambarelli.



Bubbling WAY down under:
 
Number 197 "Dragging Me Down" by Inspiral Carpets
Peak: number 197
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks

We last saw English band Inspiral Carpets in 1991.

"Dragging Me Down" was the lead single from their third studio album Revenge of the Goldfish (number 123, June 1993), which debuted on the ARIA albums chart in November 1992, but did not reach its peak until nearly eight months later.

Internationally, "Dragging Me Down" peaked at number 30 in Ireland in February 1992, and number 12 in the UK in March 1992.
 
On the state charts, "Dragging Me Down" performed strongest in Western Australia, where it reached number 158.
 
We'll next see Inspiral Carpets in July 1992.



Number 203 "The Real Thing" by Kenny Loggins
Peak: number 198
Peak date: 13 July 1992
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks
 
American singer Kenny Loggins made his debut on the Australian charts with "Whenever I Call You "Friend"" (number 26, December 1978) in 1978.  Between then and 1986, Kenny racked up six top 100 singles in Australia, with "Footloose" (number 1, May 1984) being the biggest of those, from the Footloose soundtrack (number 2, July 1984).  Kenny scored another soundtrack hit with "Danger Zone" (number 14, September 1986), from the Top Gun soundtrack (number 3, October 1986).  Kenny (and his beard) also made a memorable contribution to USA for Africa's "We Are the World" (number 1, April 1985) - not counted in the tally of Kenny's hits above.

"The Real Thing" was the second single lifted from Kenny's seventh studio album Leap of Faith, which does not appear to have been released in Australia.  It followed the single "Conviction of the Heart", which was released in Australia in December 1991 but failed to chart.

Internationally, "The Real Thing" peaked at number 39 in Canada in April 1992, and number 5 on the meaningless US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart in April 1992.

Within Australia, "The Real Thing" was most popular in Western Australia, where it reached number 162.

Kenny would land one further charting single in Australia, "For the First Time" (number 81, May 1997) - minus beard, from the One Fine Day soundtrack (number 41, April 1997).  He would have two further low-charting albums in Australia: The Essential Kenny Loggins (number 428, September 2005) and Playlist: The Rock 'n' Roll Years, 1979-1988 (number 1064, June 2012).
 


Next week (1 June): Six top 150 entries and three bubbling WAY down under entries.

< Previous week: 18 May 1992                                    Next week: 1 June 1992 >

18 May 2024

Week commencing 18 May 1992

This week in 1992 sees a bumper ten new top 150 entries, with a further three bubbling WAY down under.  A theme running through this week's new entries is that quite a few of them did a bit better, landing within the top 100, on the rival Australian Music Report singles chart.
 
In other news, I have updated some earlier posts (a work in progress...) with newly-uncovered singles peaking outside the top 150, namely:
 
* 13 March 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Glass Tiger;
* 20 March 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from The Smithereens;
* 24 April 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Not Drowning, Waving;
* 8 May 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Amy Grant;
* 5 June 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entries from Tom Jones, Ten City, Cameo and Keith Richards;
* 13 May 1991 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Shawn Christopher;
* 9 September 1991 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Peabo Bryson.
 
Jenny Morris landed a break in her hit-run this week in 1992.
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 120 "What a Lover" by Eve
Peak: number 120
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks
 
I wasn't aware of this track at the time, and can't tell you much about it, other than Eve was probably an Australian artist, as only an Australian pressing is listed on discogs.com.  This is the only release listed under that artist on the site.

"What a Lover" performed strongest on the South Australia/Northern Territory state chart, where it reached number 42.  "What a Lover" also peaked higher on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 85.



Number 124 "Don't Lose the Magic" by Shawn Christopher
Peak: number 124
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks
Weeks on chart: 5 weeks

We last saw American house singer Shawn Christopher in 1991.  "Don't Lose the Magic" was her second and final single to chart in Australia.  I didn't know this song at the time, but it was on a various artists music video compilation I recently picked up.  I like it.

Internationally, "Don't Lose the Magic" peaked at number 30 in the UK in March 1992, number 71 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in March 1992, number 27 in the Netherlands in May 1992, and number 30 in the Flanders region of Belgium in June 1992.

Domestically, "Don't Lose the Magic" performed strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 104.

To my ears, "Don't Lose the Magic" has that Steve "Silk" Hurley sound that was popular in 1991-2, though he was not involved in its production.



Number 125 "Crackerjack Man" by Jenny Morris
Peak: number 125
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 3 weeks
Weeks on chart: 8 weeks
 
New Zealand singer Jenny Morris made her first appearance on the Australian chart in 1982 with the single "Puberty Blues" (number 88, February 1982), title track of the Australian film of the same name.  Jenny returned in November 1983 as the lead singer of QED, with the track "Everywhere I Go" (number 19, April 1984); a song I remember vividly from the time, when I was in Grade Prep at school.

Jenny then launched her solo career proper with the single "Get Some Humour" (number 82, February 1986).  Between 1986 and 1992, Jenny amassed seven top 40 singles in Australia, with the highest-peaking of those being "Break in the Weather" (number 2, October 1991).
 
"Crackerjack Man" was the fourth and final single from Jenny's third solo album Honeychild (number 5, October 1991). It followed "Break in the Weather", "I've Had You" (number 39, January 1992), and "Zero" (number 89, March 1992).

On the state charts, "Crackerjack Man" performed strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 116.

I don't recall hearing "Crackerjack Man" at the time, but became familiar with it when digitising Jenny's The Best of Jenny Morris: The Story So Far VHS tape in 2005.  I had forgotten how the song went prior to listening to it again when writing this post, though I do like it.

"Crackerjack Man" fared better on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it peaked at number 98.
 
Unfortunately, Jenny has had the neurological voice disorder spasmodic dysphonia for some time, making it difficult for her to speak let alone sing, as it gives the voice a strangled-strained quality, resulting in voice breaks.  I first became aware of spasmodic dysphonia at university, where I studied speech pathology, in the late 1990s.  Coincidentally, that's also where I first heard of BoTox (it can be injected into the vocal cords to treat spasmodic dysphonia, often giving relief for several months before needing to be injected again) - before it became widely known in association with cosmetic procedures, although Jenny has opted not to undergo this treatment when I caught her speaking about the issues she has with speaking/singing on an episode of Australian Story some years ago.

We shall next see Jenny in 1994.



Number 131 "Lift Me Up" by Howard Jones
Peak: number 131
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks
Weeks on chart: 9 weeks

British singer-songwriter Howard Jones, born John Howard Jones, first appeared on the Australian chart with "New Song" (number 60, December 1983) in November 1983. He scored six top 40 hits in Australia between 1984 and 1986, with the biggest of those being "No One Is to Blame" (number 9, June 1986).  Somehow, I wasn't aware of Howard Jones at the time (I didn't start following music properly until 1987), but knew "No One Is to Blame" then, though not who it was by or what the song was called.

Howard was last on the Australian chart in 1989 with the single "Everlasting Love" (number 91, April 1989) and the album Cross That Line (number 97, May 1989).
 
"Lift Me Up" was the lead single from Howard's fifth studio album In the Running (number 158, June 1992).  Internationally, "Lift Me Up" peaked at number 52 in the UK in April 1992, number 6 in Canada in May 1992, and number 32 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in June 1992.

Within Australia, "Lift Me Up" was most popular in South Australia/Northern Territory, where it reached number 106.

We will next see Howard in 1993.



Number 132 "I Drove All Night" by Roy Orbison
Peak: number 132
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks (2 weeks in 1992; 3 weeks in 1993)
Weeks on chart: 16 weeks (9 weeks in 1992; 7 weeks in 1993)
 
We last saw Roy Orbison in 1989.

I, like most of the world, first became familiar with the song "I Drove All Night" when Cyndi Lauper released her version of it, reaching number 11 for three weeks on the Austalian chart in July 1989.  The song, however, was originally recorded in 1987 by Roy Orbison, though his version was not released as a single until 1992, more than three years after his death at age 52 in December 1988.  I first heard Roy's rendition of "I Drove All Night" on the UK Chart Attack radio show.
 
"I Drove All Night" was written by Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly, who shared writing credits on hits such as Madonna's "Like a Virgin" (number 1, December 1984), Cyndi Lauper's "True Colors" (number 3, September 1986), Heart's "Alone" (number 6, August 1987), Whitney Houston's "So Emotional" (number 26, February 1988) and Bangles' "Eternal Flame" (number 1, May 1989) to name but a few.

The vocals from Roy's 1987 recording of "I Drove All Night" were used by Jeff Lynne who created a new mix of the track for Roy's posthumous King of Hearts (number 25, November 1992) album.  The track first appeared on the Nintendo: White Knuckle Scorin' album in 1991.

Internationally, Roy's version of "I Drove All Night" peaked at number 52 in Germany in March 1992, number 74 in Canada in May 1992, number 7 in the UK in July 1992, number 6 in Ireland, and number 48 in New Zealand in September 1992.

In Australia, "I Drove All Night" had two separate releases - a cassingle release on BMG in March 1992, and a CD/cassingle release on EMI in March 1993.  The 1992 release contained Sheena Easton's "Forever Friends" and Trixter's "Line of Fire" as B-sides, while the 1993 release contained B-sides from Roy.  The single peaked at number 132 on the ARIA singles chart in May 1992, and at number 140 in March 1993.  "I Drove All Night" performed strongest on the Queensland state chart for both releases, reaching number 87 in May 1992, and number 112 in April 1993.

The music video for "I Drove All Night" features actors Jason Priestley and Jennifer Connelly.

Céline Dion scored a hit with her version of "I Drove All Night" (number 22, March 2003) in 2003, though I prefer the Hex Hector remix of it.

Roy Orbison's recording is my favourite version of "I Drove All Night", though I like Cyndi's version too.  Another version of the song I like was recorded by The Protomen in 2012.  "I Drove All Night" is one of my favourite karaoke songs to sing... when no-one is in the vicinity.

We will next see Roy in November 1992.



Number 136 "Love U Love Me" by Atomic Dining Club
Peak: number 129
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 7 weeks
 
Australian band Atomic Dining Club were Brian Mannix - former lead singer of Uncanny X-Men, Ross McLennon and Steve Harrison.  "Love U Love Me" was their debut single, from their only album Car Crash in Blue, which had three separate release dates listed in The ARIA Report, from May, June and August of 1993.  I am not sure which was the correct release date, or whether the album was even released at all, given that no copies of it are currently listed on discogs.com, and nothing came up when I googled the band name and album title.  Does anyone reading this know whether the album saw the light of day? The album missed the ARIA top 150 albums chart - I can tell you that.

Having not heard this track before, I liked it more than I was expecting to, given that I'm not really a fan of Uncanny X-Men, whose biggest hit was "50 Years" (number 4, June 1985).

"Love U Love Me" found greater success on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 87.
 
A music video exists for "Love U Love Me", as it is listed as a new addition on the rage playlists in The ARIA Report, but nobody has yet uploaded it to YouTube.

We shall see Atomic Dining Club again in 1993.
 


Number 143 "The Big One" by Chris Wilson
Peak: number 143
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 1 week
 
"The Big One" was Australian blues musician Chris Wilson's debut single.  The track was lifted from his debut album Landlocked, which originally peaked at number 120 in Australia in August 1992, but the 30th edition re-issue of the album actually peaked higher, reaching number 86 in December 2022.

I first became aware of Chris in 1995, when he sang the male vocal on Merril Bainbridge's "Under the Water" (number 4, August 1992) - the "I'll be your loverrrr, underrrr the waterrrr" bits.  I spelt the lyric that way in jest, as despite being Australian born and bred, Chris seems to rhotacise his r-coloured vowels - that is, pronounce the 'r' in them, like speakers of American, Canadian and Irish English do.  Australian English is non-rhotic, meaning that we do not pronounce the 'r' in vowel sounds, other than in connected speech where the vowel appears at the end of the word and is followed by another word beginning with a vowel sound, as in the phrase "four of those".  My speech pathology degree comes in handy for other things sometimes...

Chris followed up this track with the single "Alimony Blues" in October 1992, which missed the top 150.

Sadly, Chris passed away in 2019, aged 62, after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

We will next see Chris in 1996, as part of the duo Wilson Diesel.
 


Number 144 "Girl for Me" by The Chevelles
Peak: number 144
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 1 week

Perth band The Chevelles formed in 1989.  The group never landed a top 100 entry, and this was their only release to trouble the top 150.  An earlier EP, The Kids Ain't Hip, curiously spent two weeks at number 8 on the ARIA top 20 Alternative Singles chart in March 1991, before re-appearing on the top 20 Alternative Albums Chart, where it reached number 10 in April 1991.

"Girl for Me" is lifted from The Chevelles' debut album Gigantic, which was released in June 1993.  The single performed better on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 97.



Number 145 "The Way I Made You Feel" by Ed Kuepper
Peak: number 144
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 2 weeks
 
Born in West Germany, but based in Australia, Ed Kuepper was a founding member and guitarist of seminal punk band The Saints, formed in 1973.  The Saints first appeared on the Australian chart with their debut single "(I'm) Stranded" (number 98, March 1977). Ed left the band in 1979, before The Saints scored their biggest hit with "Just Like Fire Would" (number 29, April 1986).

Ed's debut solo album Electrical Storm was released in September 1985, but missed the national top 100.  Ed scored his first charting single with "Nothing Changes in My House" (number 99, January 1988).  His biggest solo 'hit' in Australia was "If I Had a Ticket" (number 72, April 1994).

"The Way I Made You Feel" appeared on Ed's fifth solo studio album Honey Steel's Gold (number 28, March 1992).

We will next see Ed in July 1992.
 

 
Number 147 "Play Dinosaur" by Degenerates
Peak: number 142
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks

We last saw Australian band Degenerates in 1991.  "Play Dinosaur" was the title track from the band's debut album Play Dinosaur, which, as with Atomic Dining Club above, had three separate release dates listed in The ARIA Report (June, July and August 1992), and missed the top 150.
 
"Play Dinosaur" performed significantly better on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 68.  I have to wonder why a single peaked 74 places higher on the AMR chart...
 
This would be Degenerates' final top 150 entry, though they released a second album Outspoken in March 1993.



Bubbling WAY down under:
 
Number 189 "Bang" by Blur
Peak: number 189
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 1 week
 
We last saw English band Blur in 1991.  "Bang" was the second single released from the band's debut album Leisure (number 142, April 1992) in Australia.

Internationally, "Bang" peaked at number 24 in the UK in August 1991, and number 21 in Ireland in August 1991.  The single also peaked at number 40 on the US Billboard Dance Club songs chart in June 1992 - for what that is worth (not much, in my book).  This was classified as dance music in the US?!

Within Australia, "Bang" performed strongest in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 168.

I don't recall hearing "Bang" before, though have a VHS-sourced copy of the video in my collection from a tape I digitised, so have actually heard it before.  Musically, it sounds quite similar to "There's No Other Way" to me.

"Bang" has been virtually disowned by Blur, who wrote the song in response to pressure they were placed under by their record label to produce another hit.  The band's bass player Alex James said in a 1999 interview that he didn't think the band would ever play the song live again.

We will next see Blur in 1993.
 
 
 
Number 209 "Closer Than Close" by Peabo Bryson
Peak: number 209
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 1 week
 
We last saw American singer-songwriter Peabo Bryson in 1991.
 
"Closer Than Close" was issued as the second single from Peabo's fifteenth studio album Can You Stop the Rain (number 188, March 1992).  Interestingly, this single was released in Australia in February 1992, but took just over three months to register on the charts.

"Closer Than Close" missed the US Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number 10 on the pointless Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart in November 1991.

Within Australia, "Closer Than Close" peaked highest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 186.

Peabo would land his final hits in Australia with the duets "Beauty and the Beast" (number 17, July 1992) with Céline Dion, and "A Whole New World (Aladdin's Theme)" (number 10, June 1993) with Regina Belle.  Both tracks were themes from Disney movies, Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin, respectively.

While we won't see Peabo bubbling under again, he had further low-charting albums in Australia with Through the Fire (number 193, August 1994) and Missing You (number 619, October 2007).


 
Number 211 "The Guitar (The Lion Sleeps Tonight)" by They Might Be Giants
Peak: number 180
Peak date: 8 June 1992
Weeks on chart: 3 weeks

We last saw American band They Might Be Giants in March 1992.  "The Guitar (The Lion Sleeps Tonight)" was the second single from their fourth studio album Apollo 18 (number 59, April 1992).
 
"The Guitar (The Lion Sleeps Tonight)" came together in a jam session based around The Tokens' "The Lion Sleeps Tonight". The song's chorus is sung by country singer Laura Cantrell.

I cannot find evidence of "The Guitar..." charting anywhere else.  Within Australia, the single performed strongest in Queensland, where it reached number 156.

We shall next see They Might Be Giants in 1994.



Next week (25 May): A quieter week, with three top 150 entries and two bubbling WAY down under debuts.

< Previous week: 11 May 1992                                         Next week: 25 May 1992 >

11 May 2024

Week commencing 11 May 1992

One thing this week in 1992's new entries on the Australian singles chart that peaked outside the top 100 have in common is that I do not recall hearing any of them at the time.
 
Boyz II Men: uhhing and aahing in the lower region of the ARIA top 200.
 
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 136 "Born Free" by Vic Reeves and The Roman Numerals
Peak: number 130
Peak dates: 18 May 1992 and 25 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks
 
English comedian Vic Reeves, born Jim Moir, came to fame in in the UK in late 1986, when he first appeared in comedy game show segment on the TV program The Tube.  Prior to becoming known as Vic the comedian, Jim performed in several bands, and sold cassette recordings of his music through the British music newspaper NME.

Vic first came to attention in Australia through his musical collaboration with The Wonder Stuff, whom we shall see in 1993, with a cover version of "Dizzy" (number 3, March 1992), originally recorded by Tommy Roe (number 2 in Australia in 1969).  Vic & The Wonder Stuff's cover of "Dizzy" went all the way to number 1 in the UK in November 1991.

"Born Free", another cover - this time originally performed by Matt Monro in 1966, was released prior to "Dizzy" in the UK, peaking at number 6 there in April 1991, and at number 11 in Ireland in May 1991.  The track appears on Vic's only studio album I Will Cure You (number 142, April 1992).

"Born Free" was Vic's last single released in Australia. One later charting single, credited to just Vic Reeves, was issued in the UK - "Abide with Me", reaching number 47 there in December 1991.  Musically, it is quite different to "Born Free" and "Dizzy", having more of a dance-pop sound.
 

 
Number 142 "In the Ghetto" by Beats International
Peak: number 142
Peak date: 11 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 1 week
Weeks on chart: 9 weeks
 
We last saw Beats International in December 1991.  "In the Ghetto" was the third single lifted from the collective's second album Excursion on the Version, which was released in Australia in November 1991, but failed to chart.

Internationally, "In the Ghetto" peaked at number 44 in the UK in November 1991, number 89 in Germany in January 1992, and number 7 in New Zealand in March 1992.

Within Australia, "In the Ghetto" performed equally-strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory and Queensland, peaking at number 132 on both state charts.  This was the act's final release to chart in Australia.

Beats International mastermind, Norman Cook, however, would find more success in Australia towards the end of the 1990s as Fatboy Slim, returning with the single "The Rockefella Skank" (number 32, July 1998) - a song that reminds me vividly of my 'clubbing' days, and the album You've Come a Long Way, Baby (number 2, February 1999).
 

 
Number 144 "O Fortuna" by Apotheosis
Peak: number 104
Peak date: 24 August 1992
Weeks in top 150: 15 weeks

O Fortuna was originally a medieval Latin Goliardic poem, written in the early 1200s CE.  It was first set to music by German composer Carl Orff in the mid-1930s.  I think I first became aware of the song when it was used in my high school's 1992 Rock Eisteddfod performance (skip to the 5 minute mark), centered around the assassination of US president John F. Kennedy.  My school actually won the national competition that year, despite finishing second in the state.  And no, I wasn't in it.
 
A Belgian act, Apotheosis were Patrick Samoy and Luc Rigaux, also known as Steve Humby & Andy Sykes.  Internationally, their version of "O Fortuna" peaked at number 3 in the Netherlands in February 1992, and at number 29 in the Flanders region of Belgium during the same month.

In Australia, "O Fortuna" ties for the most weeks spent in the ARIA top 150 for a single peaking between numbers 101 and 150 that debuted in the top 150 during 1992, spending 15 weeks in this region of the chart.  We shall see the single it ties with for chart longevity in June 1992.  Interestingly, "O Fortuna" climbed to number 107 on the national chart on 1 June 1992, but did not reach its peak, 3 places higher, until its second last week in the top 150, in late August 1992.
 
On the state charts, "O Fortuna" performed much stronger in Western Australia that elsewhere, reaching number 28 there in June 1992.   The single peaked higher on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 81.

F.C.B. scored a much bigger hit in Australia with "Excalibur" (number 2, August 1995), which was another dance track based on "O Fortuna".
 
"O Fortuna" would be Apotheosis' only top 150 charting entry in Australia.


 
Number 145 "It's Over Now" by L.A. Guns
Peak: Number 133
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 2 weeks
Weeks on chart: 3 weeks
 
American glam metal band L.A. Guns formed in 1983 in Los Angeles.  Their first taste of chart success in Australia came with their second studio album, Cocked & Loaded (number 119, October 1989).  "It's Over Now" was lifted from the band's third album Hollywood Vampires (number 91, August 1991).
 
Internationally, "It's Over Now" peaked at number 62 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in May 1992.  Domestically, the single performed strongest in Queensland, where it reached number 106.
 
I don't normally listen to this kind of music, but the rock ballad is not bad.
 
"It's Over Now" was the only L.A. Guns single to chart in Australia, although the band had several later albums that registered a chart placing, namely Vicious Circle (number 158, April 1995), The Missing Peace (number 688, October 2017), The Devil You Know (number 757, April 2019), Renegades (number 754, November 2020), Cocked & Loaded Live (number 1245, January 2022), and Checkered Past (number 1046, April 2022).
 

 
Bubbling WAY down under:
 
Number 176 "Who Wants to Live Forever"/"Friends Will Be Friends" by Queen
Peak: number 165
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 3 weeks

We last saw Queen in May 1991.  Both "Who Wants to Live Forever" and "Friends Will Be Friends" originally appeared on Queen's twelfth studio album A Kind of Magic (number 12, August 1986), and more-recently, the compilation Greatest Hits II (number 4, December 1991), which was released shortly before front man Freddie Mercury's untimely death in November 1991.
 
"Who Wants to Live Forever" is unusual for a Queen single in that guitarist Brian May, whom we saw bubble under solo in March 1992, shares the lead vocal with Freddie.

"Friends Will Be Friends" was originally released as the third single from the album in Australia in November 1986, though it missed the Kent Music Report top 100, ranking ninth on the list of singles with significant sales reports beyond the top 100 in December 1986.
 
The 1986 issue of "Friends Will Be Friends" peaked at number 14 in the UK in June 1986, number 4 in Ireland in June 1986, number 16 in the Netherlands in July 1986, number 18 in the Flanders region of Belgium in July 1986, number 19 in Switzerland in August 1986, number 50 in New Zealand in August 1986, and number 20 in West Germany in August 1986.

The 1986 release of "Who Wants to Live Forever" peaked at number 24 in the UK in September 1986, number 15 in Ireland in September 1986, number 29 in the Netherlands in October 1986, and number 52 in West Germany in November 1986.

The 1992 double A-side single appears to have only been released in a limited number of countries.  It peaked at number 6 in the Netherlands in May 1992, and at number 44 in the Flanders region of Belgium during the same month.
 
In Australia, the 1992 release of "Who Wants to Live Forever"/"Friends Will Be Friends" performed strongest on the South Australia/Northern Territory state chart, where it reached number 128.

We shall next see Queen in 1996.




Number 183 "Uhh Ahh" by Boyz II Men
Peak: number 180
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 3 weeks
 
American vocal harmony quartet Boyz II Men formed in 1985, when they were still in high school in Philadelphia, under the name of Unique Attraction.  Boyz II Men's first single, "Motownphilly" (number 32, October 1991), which I quite enjoyed, dented the lower region of the top 40 in Australia, while climbing to number 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in September 1991.  Within Australia, "Motownphilly" had quite varied fortunes on the state charts, reaching number 18 in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, but only peaking at number 104 in South Australia/Northern Territory!
 
The band's second single, "It's So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday", reached number 2 in the US in December 1991, but was not released locally until 1993, when it reached number 100 in July 1993.

Both tracks were lifted from Boyz II Men's debut album Cooleyhighharmony, which initially peaked at number 140 in Australia October 1991, before climbing to number 4 in January 1993 after the success of "End of the Road" (number 1 for four weeks in November-December 1992), taken from the Boomerang: Original Soundtrack Album (number 29, October 1992) and being tacked onto Cooleyhighharmony.
 
Internationally, "Uhh Ahh" peaked at number 16 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in March 1992.  Domestically, the single performed strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 156.
 
We will next see Boyz II Men in July 1991.
 

 
Number 199 "The Bottle" by The Tyrrel Corporation
Peak: number 199
Peak date: 11 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 1 week
 
We previously saw English duo The Tyrrel Corporation in February 1992.  "The Bottle" was the second single lifted from the pair's debut album North East of Eden (number 273, December 1992).

"The Bottle", which I am guessing is about alcohol addiction, peaked at number 71 in the UK in March 1992.  Within Australia, "The Bottle" performed strongest in Western Australia, where it reached number 168.

A heavily-edited version of "The Bottle" is used in the music video embedded below.  You can hear the full-length album version here.

We shall next see The Tyrrel Corporation in September 1992.



Next week (18 May): A bumper week with ten new top 150 debuts and three bubbling WAY down under entries.

< Previous week: 4 May 1992                                        Next week: 18 May 1992 >
 

04 May 2024

Week commencing 4 May 1992

It became apparent as I was writing this post that one thing all but one of this week in 1992's new entries have in common is that I did not hear them at the time - at least that I remember!  It's quite possible that I heard those that dented the US top 40, as I used to listen to the American Top 40 radio show with Shadoe Stevens back then, but I have no recollection of the songs in question.  Perhaps you heard them in 1992?  Let's take a look...
 
Lenny Kravitz: draggin' around just outside the ARIA top 100.
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 116 "Stop Draggin' Around" by Lenny Kravitz
Peak: number 101 
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks
Weeks on chart: 6 weeks

American singer-songwriter Lenny Kravitz, born Leonard Albert Kravitz, burst onto the Australian chart in November 1989 with his debut single "Let Love Rule" (number 36, January 1990), and the Let Love Rule album the following month (number 45, February 1990).  He followed it up with the singles "I Build This Garden for Us" (number 83, March 1990) and "Mr. Cab Driver" (released in Australia in May 1990, did not chart).

"Stop Draggin' Around" was issued as the fourth single from Lenny's second album Mama Said (number 10, July 1991). It was preceded by the singles "Always on the Run" (number 43, June 1991), "It Ain't Over 'til It's Over" (number 10, August 1991), and "Stand by My Woman" (number 46, October 1991).  Interestingly, this single does not appear to have received a commercial release anywhere other than in Australia and New Zealand.  It did not chart elsewhere.

On the state charts, "Stop Draggin' Around" performed strongest in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 89.  I don't recall hearing this one at the time, though probably caught the video, which uses a live performance, on rage.  You can listen to the studio version here.

We shall next see Lenny in 1996.



Number 131 "Fait Accompli" by Curve
Peak: number 121
Peak dates: 18 May 1992 and 25 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 6 weeks
Weeks on chart: 6 weeks
 
We first saw English duo Curve in November 1991.  "Fait Accompli" was the lead single from the band's first album Doppelganger (number 136, May 1992).  It was the pair's only single to crack the ARIA top 150, performing strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 94.
 
Internationally, "Fait Accompli" peaked at number 29 in Ireland in February 1992, and number 22 in the UK in March 1992.  If the Wikipedia page for the single is accurate, this was apparently one of the first singles to chart in the UK without being available on the 7" vinyl format.

I don't recall hearing this one at the time, but have seen the video on rage a couple of times in the interim years.

We will next see Curve in August 1992.
 

 
Number 144 "Je T'aime Mélancolie" by Mylène Farmer
Peak: number 142
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 2 weeks 

French singer, or should that be chanteuse, Mylène Farmer, born Mylène Jeanne Gautier, released her first single in France in 1984.  "Je Taime Mélancolie", which translates as 'I love you melancholy', appears to have been Mylène's first release in Australia, and her only one to crack the ARIA top 150.
 
I did actually hear/see this one at the time, catching an airing of the video on Video Smash Hits.  Internationally, the single peaked at number 3 in France in February 1992, and number 70 in Germany in March 1992.  The track was lifted from Mylène's third studio album L'autre..., which translates as 'the other'.
 
Mylène released another single in Australia in August 1992, "Disénchantée", but that missed the top 150.

Perhaps the most interesting thing I can tell you about this release is that I received a follow request from Mylène (her official account) on Instagram, on my 'personal' account, some years ago, which I found rather... intriguing!

Songs sung in French are a rarity on the Australian chart, though we have seen two singles sung in French bubble under previously, in December 1989 and April 1990.  The only other examples from around this time I can think of are Enigma's "Sadeness Part 1" (number 2, March 1991), which was only partly in French, and Vanessa Paradis' "Joe Le Taxi" - which missed the national chart (before it extended beyond number 100), but made number 79 on the Western Australia state chart in July 1988.  Of course, Plastic Bertrand scored a number 2 hit here in January 1979 with "Ça Plane Pour Moi".  There was also Kylie Minogue's "Je Ne Sais Pas Pourquoi" (number 11, December 1988), but only the title was sung in French.

Edit - a reader reminded me of Jordy's "Dur Dur D'être Bébé!" (number 37, January 1994), another song sung in French that charted in Australia.  How could I have forgotten that one?!  We will actually see Jordy bubble under at the end of 1993.



Number 147 "Mama I'm Coming Home" by Ozzy Osbourne
Peak: number 127
Peak date: 22 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 8 weeks 

We last saw Ozzy Osbourne bubble under in October 1991.  This was his final solo single to crack the ARIA top 150, though he would score several later charting albums.  "Mama I'm Coming Home" was lifted from Ozzy's sixth solo studio album No More Tears (number 49, October 1991).
 
Internationally, "Mama I'm Coming Home" peaked at number 46 in the UK in November 1991, number 27 in Germany in February 1992, number 42 in Austria in February 1992, number 62 in Switzerland, number 28 in the US in April 1992, and number 48 in New Zealand in June 1992.

I don't recall hearing this one before.  I actually enjoyed it more than I was expecting to, though it's not something I would actively seek out.

Ozzy was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, which a family member of mine has also recently been diagnosed with, in 2019.
 


Bubbling WAY down under:

Number 185 "On a Sunday Afternoon" by Lighter Shade of Brown featuring Shiro and intro by Huggy Boy
Peak: number 162
Peak date: 11 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 6 weeks

American hip-hop duo Lighter Shade of Brown, also known as A Lighter Shade of Brown and LSOB, formed in California in 1989.  "On a Sunday Afternoon" was lifted from the group's debut album Brown & Proud, which did not chart in Australia.

Internationally, "On a Sunday Afternoon" peaked at number 39 in the US in February 1992, number 1 in New Zealand for two weeks in April and May 1992, and 49 in the Netherlands in September 1992.  I find it interesting that New Zealand seemed much more receptive to hip-hop tracks than Australia in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Within Australia, "On a Sunday Afternoon" performed strongest in Western Australia, where it reached number 140.

I don't recall hearing "On a Sunday Afternoon" before, but the music sounded familiar to me, as it samples The Rascals' "Groovin'", which peaked at number 4 in Australia in 1967, and I must have heard before.

Lighter Shade of Brown would eventually crack the top 100 in Australia with "Spill the Rhyme" (number 90, July 1993), and landed their biggest hit with "Hey DJ" (number 12, July 1994).

We shall see Lighter Shade of Brown bubble under next in 1993.
 


Number 192 "Breakin' My Heart (Pretty Brown Eyes)" by Mint Condition
Peak: number 192
Peak date: 4 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 1 week

American r&b group Mint Condition formed in Minneapolis in 1985.  Their first recordings, however, were not released until 1991.  "Breakin' My Heart (Pretty Brown Eyes)" was the second single, and their first Australian release, from their debut album Meant to Be Mint, which does not appear to have been released locally.  This track was the band's only charting release in Australia, performing strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 183.

Internationally, "Breakin' My Heart (Pretty Brown Eyes)" peaked at number 6 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in April 1992.

As with Ozzy Osbourne above, I enjoyed this track more than I was expecting to, though it's not something I would actively seek out.



Next week (11 May): Four new top 150 entries and three bubbling WAY down under debuts.

< Previous week: 27 April 1992                                        Next week: 11 May 1992 >