15 June 2024

Week commencing 15 June 1992

All five of this week in 1992's new top 150-peaking debuts enter between number 142 and number 150, which is an unusual occurrence.  Shall we take a look?

Before doing so, I have updated the following earlier posts:

* 21 May 1990 - with new bubbling WAY down under debut from The Smithereens featuring Belinda Carlisle;
* 11 June 1990 - with new bubbling WAY down under entry from 2 Static;
* 25 June 1990 - with new bubbling WAY down under entry from Romi & Jazz.
 
Wet Wet Wet didn't exactly make a big 'splash' with this single in 1992.
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 142 "This Time Tomorrow" by Alex Smith
Peak: number 121
Peak date: 6 July 1992
Weeks in top 150: 11 weeks
 
I had no recollection of this track, and didn't realise until researching it that Alex was the lead singer of Australian band Moving Pictures, who scored a massive hit with "What About Me?" (number 1 for six weeks in March-April 1982).  Moving Pictures disbanded in 1987, after landing seven top 100 singles in Australia between 1981 and 1984.  Alex then went solo - although "This Time Tomorrow" appears to be his only solo single released.

"This Time Tomorrow" performed much stronger in South Australia/Northern Territory than elsewhere, reaching number 29 on the state chart.  The single also fared better on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 87.

Listening to "This Time Tomorrow" for the first time, it sounds a bit Meat Loaf-ish (well, like it could have been written by Jim Steinman) in parts, to my ears; perhaps minus some of the more melodramatic/operatic moments.

A solo album from Alex, The Thread, is listed as having been released in 2019 on discogs.com, but "This Time Tomorrow" would be Alex's only solo top 150 entry.

 
 
Number 143 "Make It Tonight" by Wet Wet Wet
Peak: number 110
Peak date: 22 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks
Weeks on chart: 5 weeks

Scottish band Wet Wet Wet formed in 1982, although their first studio recordings were not released until 1987.  Their debut single "Wishing I Was Lucky" was initially released in Australia in August 1987, but failed to chart until it was re-issued, eventually spending one week at number 100 in August 1988.  Wet Wet Wet's first charting single in Australia, "Sweet Little Mystery" (number 33, May 1988) made minor ripples, as did their debut album Popped In Souled Out (number 60, June 1988).
 
Wet Wet Wet returned with the single "Sweet Surrender" (number 7, May 1990), which took six months to peak after its Australian release in November 1989.  One top 40 single per album in Australia seemed to be a pattern forming for the band, with "Goodnight Girl" (number 21, April 1992) being the only top 100 entry from their third album High on the Happy Side (number 19, May 1992).  "Make It Tonight", issued as the album's first single in the UK, where it reached number 37 in September 1991, was released as the second single from High on the Happy Side in Australia.
 
Within Australia, "Make It Tonight" performed strongest in South Australia/Northern Territory, where it reached number 87.  I recall catching the video for this track once on rage as a new release before the top 60 chart countdown commenced, in June 1992.
 
Of course, Wet Wet Wet would go on to score their biggest hit with "Love Is All Around", which was number 1 for six weeks in June-July 1994, going on to become the highest-selling single of the year in Australia.

One childhood memory I have of Wet Wet Wet is when my paternal grandmother and great uncle returned to Australia from living in Scotland for a couple of years in 1990, and asked if I knew of Wet Wet Wet when they discovered I had gotten into music in a big way since they had been away.

We shall next see Wet Wet Wet in October 1992.
 


Number 145 "Close but No Cigar" by Thomas Dolby
Peak: number 107
Peak date: 13 July 1992
Weeks in top 150: 7 weeks
Weeks on chart: 12 weeks

English singer-songwriter and producer Thomas Dolby, born Thomas Morgan Robertson, made his chart debut in Australia with the single "She Blinded Me with Science" (number 19, June 1983).  However, before that release, Thomas wrote Lene Lovich's "New Toy" (number 29, August 1981) - also appearing in the video and performing on the track, and playing the synthesizer riffs on Foreigner's "Urgent" (number 24, November 1981) and "Waiting for a Girl Like You" (number 3, February 1982).
 
Thomas also performed as a session musician on Def Leppard's Pyromania (number 70, February 1984) and Joni Mitchell's Dog Eat Dog (number 86, January 1986) albums.

Thomas landed two further top 100 singles in Australia, with "Hyperactive!" (number 26, April 1984) and "Airhead" (number 69, June 1988).  He also scored charting albums with The Golden Age of Wireless (number 72, July 1983), The Flat Earth (number 71, May 1984) and Aliens Ate My Buick (number 76, June 1988).

"Close but No Cigar" was the lead single from Thomas' fourth studio album Astronauts & Heretics (number 123, August 1992).  Internationally, the single peaked at number 22 in the UK in May 1992, number 88 in Germany in July 1992, and number 14 in New Zealand in September 1992.
 
Within Australia, "Close but No Cigar" was much more popular in Western Australia, where it reached number 41, than in any other state.  The next-highest state chart peak "Close but No Cigar" reached was number 94 in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory.
 
"Close but No Cigar" entered the Australian Music Report top 100 singles chart, where it peaked at number 80.

We will next see Thomas in September 1992.


 
Number 147 "Big Love" by BB Steal
Peak: number 145
Peak date: 22 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 2 weeks

We last saw Australian band BB Steal back in 1989.  "Big Love" was the band's second, and final, top 150 single.  The track was lifted from their debut album On the Edge (number 144, July 1992). To my ears, this track sounds a bit Def Leppard/Mutt Lange in the chorus and the bridge leading into it.



Number 150 "Shameless" by Garth Brooks
Peak: number 103
Peak date: 6 July 1992
Weeks in top 150: 6 weeks
 
American country singer Garth Brooks released his first album Garth Brooks in 1989.  However, his first album to dent the ARIA top 150 was his third studio release, Ropin' the Wind (number 21, July 1992), from which the single "Shameless" was lifted.  A previous single, "The Thunder Rolls", from Garth's second album No Fences (number 11, August 1994), was issued locally in November 1991, but missed the top 150.

"Shameless" is a cover version of a song written and originally recorded by Billy Joel, which we saw bubble under in January 1992.

Garth's version of "Shameless" peaked at number 1 for two weeks on the meaningless US Billboard Hot Country Songs and Country Airplay charts in November 1991, number 71 in the UK in January 1992, and number 43 in the Netherlands in March 1992.

Garth would land his first top 100 single in Australia with "Standing Outside the Fire" (number 45, September 1994), which was quickly followed by his highest-charting single here with "One Night a Day" (number 35, September 1994).  Both tracks were lifted from Garth's sixth studio album In Pieces (number 1, August 1994), which was his major commercial breakthrough in Australia.

We will next see Garth in 1994.



Bubbling WAY down under:
 
Number 163 "Dunno What It Is (About You)" by The Beatmasters featuring Elaine Vassell
Peak: number 162
Peak date: 6 July 1992
Weeks on chart: 4 weeks

We last saw English dance act The Beatmasters in 1990.
 
"Dunno What It Is (About You)" was released as the first single from their second album Life & Soul (number 162, August 1992) in the UK in early 1991, when it originally peaked at number 82 in February 1991.  Following "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" (number 93, February 1992), the single was remixed and re-released, achieving a higher peak of number 43 in the UK in May 1992.
 
Within Australia, "Dunno What It Is (About You)" performed strongest in Western Australia, where it reached number 140.

You can view the original 1991 video for "Dunno What It Is (About You)" here, and the video for the 1992 remixed version is embedded below.
 
In keeping with each of The Beatmasters' previous singles, this one features a different vocalist, Elaine Vassell, who would later go on to be part of UK soul act FreeSpirit, with the single "No More Rainy Days" peaking at number 68 in the UK in May 1995.

"Dunno What It Is (About You)" would be The Beatmasters' final charting single.



Number 182 "Grow Or Pay" by D.A.D.
Peak: number 182
Peak date: 15 June 1992
Weeks on chart: 1 week
 
D.A.D, short for Disneyland After Dark, are a Danish rock/metal band who burst onto the Australian chart in October 1989 with "Sleeping My Day Away" (number 63, March 1990), which I like, despite generally not being a huge metal fan.  They followed it up with "Girl Nation" (number 52, March 1990), "Jihad" (number 89, July 1990), and the album No Fuel Left for the Pilgrims (number 29, April 1990), which was actually the band's third studio album.

The band returned with their fourth album Riskin' It All (number 80, June 1992), led by the single "Bad Craziness" (number 86, March 1992). "Grow Or Pay" was the second single lifted from the album.  I cannot find evidence of the single charting anywhere else.

In Australia, "Grow Or Pay" performed strongest in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 162.
 
A funny memory of D.A.D. I have is when they appeared on Countdown Revolution in 1990, and co-hosted some segments.  One of the band members erroneously announced Nick Barker and The Reptiles' "Resurrection Time" (number 86, February 1990) as "Erection Time".  Oh dear.

We shall see D.A.D. one more time, in 1995.



Number 191 "Ride the Bullet" by Army of Lovers
Peak: number 191
Peak date: 15 June 1992
Weeks on chart: 1 week

Still in Scandinavia, we last saw Swedish group Army of Lovers in February 1992.
 
"Ride the Bullet" originally appeared on the band's debut album Disco Extravaganza, which was not released in Australia.  A remixed version of the track appeared on the band's second album, which contained a couple of tracks from their debut, Massive Luxury Overdose (number 126, March 1992). 
 
Internationally, "Ride the Bullet" peaked at number 32 in Sweden in April 1992, number 67 in the UK in April 1992, number 40 in Switzerland in April 1992, number 22 in Germany in May 1992, number 34 in the Netherlands in May 1992, number 12 in the Flanders region of Belgium in May 1992, and number 4 in Austria in June 1992.
 
In Australia, "Ride the Bullet" performed strongest in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 176.
 
Two different videos were filmed for "Ride the Bullet".  The original version, which you can view here, features original band member La Camilla, who left Army of Lovers in late 1991 and was replaced by Michaela de la Cour, who appears in the second video, embedded below, despite 'her' vocals not being re-recorded.  You can view an amusing TV interview here, where La Camilla is a 'surprise' guest on the show featuring the band's new line-up.  La Camilla enters the screen at 2 minutes 30 seconds in.  Turn on the subtitles.
 
This would be Army of Lover's final charting release in Australia.  We would see band member Alexander Bard appear as the video director (and speaking a few lines) in Alcazar's "Crying at the Discotheque" (number 14, March 2002), which he co-produced.



Number 200 "Sleeping with the Lights On" by Curtis Stigers
Peak: number 200
Peak date: 15 June 1992
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks
 
American jazz singer Curtis Stigers made small ripples on the Australian chart in early 1992 with his debut single "I Wonder Why" (number 92, March 1992), which would go on to greater success when re-issued as the I Wonder Why EP (number 43, November 1992) to coincide with his Australian tour later in the year.
 
"Sleeping with the Lights On" was issued as the second single from Curtis' debut album Curtis Stigers (number 84, October 1992) in Australia.  The track peaked at number 96 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in June 1992, and number 53 in the UK in July 1992.

Domestically, "Sleeping with the Lights On" was most-popular in South Australia/Northern Territory, where it reached number 182.

We shall next see Curtis in 1993.



Next week (22 June): Eight top 150 debuts, including the first appearance of a single that would chart again in 1993 and 1994; plus two bubbling WAY down under entries.

< Previous week: 8 June 1992                                      Next week: 22 June 1992 >

08 June 2024

Week commencing 8 June 1992

This week in 1992 saw a meager three new entries peaking in the 101-150 region of the Australian singles chart.  Before taking a look at them, I have updated the following previous posts:

* 11 February 1991 - with a new bubbling WAY down under entry from Adamski;
* 13 January 1992 - with a new bubbling WAY down under entry from Adamski.

 
Nina Hagen got her body, but not really a 'hit' with this track.
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 132 "Hang on in There Baby" by Curiosity
Peak: number 127
Peak date: 15 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks
Weeks on chart: 8 weeks

We last saw British band Curiosity Killed the Cat in 1989.  Since then, bass player Nick Thorpe had quit the group, and the remaining members shortened the band's name to just Curiosity.

"Hang on in There Baby", a cover version of a song originally written and recorded by Johnny Bristol (number 37, December 1974), was issued as the first single from the band's third album Back to Front, which does not appear to have been released in Australia.

Internationally, "Hang on in There Baby" peaked at number 3 in the UK in May 1992, number 10 in Ireland in May 1992, number 26 in Austria in June 1992, number 42 in Germany in June 1992, number 31 in Sweden in July 1992, number 38 in the Flanders region of Belgium in July 1992, and number 32 in New Zealand in July 1992.

Within Australia, "Hang on in There Baby" performed strongest in Western Australia, where it reached number 81.
 
Curiosity would release one further single in Australia, "I Need Your Lovin'", in October 1992, but it failed to chart.  "Hang on in There Baby" would be the band's final release to chart within Australia.
 


Number 134 "Feel So Real" by Dream Frequency featuring Debbie Sharp
Peak: number 113
Peak date: 29 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 7 weeks
Weeks on chart: 10 weeks
 
Dream Frequency were English musician Ian Bland and American singer Debbie Sharp, although the latter was credited as a featured artist on this release.  "Feel So Real" was the act's third single release in the UK, but their first in Australia, following two minor UK top 100 singles with "Live the Dream" (UK number 99, May 1990) and "Love, Peace and Harmony" (UK number 71, January 1991).
 
Internationally, "Feel So Real" peaked at number 23 in the UK in February 1992, and number 26 in Ireland in February 1992.

In Australia, "Feel So Real" was most popular in Western Australia, where it reached number 70 on the state chart.

The track was lifted from Dream Frequency's debut album One Nation (number 160, January 1993).  Dream Frequency would land their biggest 'hit' in Australia with their next single, "Take Me", which reached number 62 in September 1992.  We shall see a remixed version of that track bubble under in August 1992.



Number 135 "Get Your Body!" by Adamski featuring Nina Hagen
Peak: number 114
Peak date: 22 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks
Weeks on chart: 8 weeks
 
We last saw English artist Adamski in January 1992.  "Get Your Body!" was the second single lifted from Adamski's second album Naughty (number 186, July 1992).

For this track, Adamski collaborated with German singer-songwriter Nina Hagen, who had been releasing material since 1978, but had never landed a charting release in Australia until now.  If you're unfamiliar with Nina (real name Catharina Hagen), I recommend checking out the crazy video for her 1982 single "Smack Jack", which is one of the videos I chose when I won a competition to program an hour of the Australian music video program rage in 2010.

Internationally, "Get Your Body" peaked at number 68 in the UK in March 1992.  Within Australia, the single performed strongest in Queensland, where it reached number 92.
 
This would be Adamski's final single to chart in Australia.



Next week (15 June): Five top 150 entries and four bubbling WAY down under debuts.

< Previous week: 1 June 1992                                     Next week: 15 June 1992 >

01 June 2024

Week commencing 1 June 1992

Five of this week in 1992's six new entries peaking between numbers 101 and 150 climbed no higher than their entry position, which is an unusual occurrence.  Shall we take a look?

Before doing so, I have updated the following post:

* 28 August 1989 - newly-uncovered bubbling WAY down under entry for Eartha Kitt and Bronski Beat.
 
M People: not quite moving on up into the ARIA top 200 yet.
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 123 "Take My Advice" by Kym Sims
Peak: number 123
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks
Weeks on chart: 4 weeks

We last saw American songstress Kym Sims in March 1992.
 
"Take My Advice" was the second single lifted from Kym's only album Too Blind to See It, which was released in Australia in April 1992 but did not chart.  I wasn't aware of this track until it appeared on a UK VHS compilation I was digitising in the late 2000s.  I am surprised that it was the bigger of Kym's two 'hits' in Australia, given that I knew the other one quite well at the time, thanks to hearing it on the American Top 40 radio show.

Internationally, "Take My Advice" peaked at number 13 in the UK in April 1992, number 18 in Ireland in April 1992, and number 86 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in May 1992.  For what it's worth (not much in my book), "Take My Advice" fared much better on the US Billboard Dance Club Songs chart, matching the number 5 peak of its predecessor in June 1992.

Within Australia, "Take My Advice" was most popular in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 99.

"Take My Advice", which has producer Steve "Silk" Hurley's trademark sound, would be Kym's final charting release in Australia.  Another single, "We Gotta Love", was issued locally in July 1996, but did not chart.  Meanwhile, Kym enjoyed middling success with a third single from her Too Blind to See It album, "A Little Bit More", which reached number 30 in the UK in June 1992.

I had wondered whether the male dancer in the "Take My Advice" video was LL Cool J, but apparently it's just a lookalike!
 
While we won't see Kym again, a song she wrote performed by another artist will appear in July 1992.

 
 
Number 124 "Story of the Blues" by Gary Moore
Peak: number 124
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 13 weeks
Weeks on chart: 14 weeks
 
We last saw Northern Irish guitar maestro Gary Moore in 1991.

"Story of the Blues" was the second single lifted from Gary's ninth solo studio album After Hours (number 8, April 1992). It followed "Cold Day in Hell" (number 42, March 1992).
 
Internationally, "Story of the Blues" peaked at number 40 in the UK in May 1992, number 99 in Germany in June 1992, and number 50 in the Netherlands in June 1992.  The track also reached number 37 on the meaningless US Billboard Mainstream Rock Airplay chart in July 1992.

Domestically, "Story of the Blues" performed strongest in South Australia/Northern Territory, where it reached number 106.

In Australia, the chart run for "Story of the Blues" was split in two, falling out of the top 150 after its initial six-week run for two weeks, before returning for another seven weeks and climbing back to number 132.  "Story of the Blues" was still charting in early September 1992.

I don't recall hearing this one before.  It's very reminiscent of Gary's "Still Got the Blues (For You)"; almost as though he was trying to record a sequel to that track.
 
A third single released from After Hours, "Separate Ways", came out in Australia in October 1992 but failed to chart.
 
We will next see Gary in 1993.


 
Number 135 "Word Is Almost At Peace" by Ghostwriters
Peak: number 135
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 3 weeks

Australian band Ghostwriters last graced our presence in February 1992.
 
"World Almost At Peace" was the third and final single lifted from the group's debut album Ghostwriters (number 96, January 1992).
 
I don't recall hearing this one before.  I quite liked it, and enjoyed it more than their actual one hit in Australia, "...Someone's Singing New York New York" (number 29, December 1991).

We shall next see Ghostwriters in 1996.
 

 
Number 138 "Cold Wind" by The Celibate Rifles
Peak: number 138
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 3 weeks
 
We last saw Australian band The Celibate Rifles in 1991.
 
"Cold Wind" was the second single lifted from the band's seventh studio album Heaven on a Stick (number 51, March 1992), not counting their contribution of two tracks on a shared EP with Hard-Ons, Where the Wild Things Are (number 51, March 1992).

This would be the last top 150 single for The Celibate Rifles.  They had later top 150-charting albums with Yizgarnnoff (number 103, May 1993), and Spaceman in a Satin Suit (number 124, May 1994).


 
Number 139 "Separate Tables" by Chris de Burgh
Peak: number 139
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 1 week

We last saw Chris de Burgh in 1991.
 
"Separate Tables" was the lead single from Chris' tenth studio album Power of Ten (number 81, June 1992).
 
Internationally, "Separate Tables" peaked at number 30 in the UK in April 1992, number 14 in Ireland in April 1992, number 39 in Germany in April 1992, and number 25 in Switzerland in May 1992.
 
"Separate Tables" would be Chris' final ARIA top 150 single, although he would have later albums denting the top 150, with This Way Up (number 149, August 1994), and Very Best of (number 75, April 1997).
 
 
 
Number 144 "Twisterella" by Ride
Peak: number 105
Peak dates: 8 June 1992 and 15 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 10 weeks
 
English band Ride formed in Oxford in 1988.  Their debut album Nowhere peaked at number 104 in Australia in July 1990, despite yielding no top 150 singles.  It was quickly followed by the compilation album Smile (number 135, July 1990), which combined the band's first two EP's Ride and Play.
 
"Twisterella" was the band's second single to dent the top 150 in Australia, following "Leave Them All Behind" (number 89, April 1992), which I have seen the video for on rage a couple of times in recent years.  Both tracks were lifted from Ride's second album Going Blank Again (number 56, April 1992).
 
Internationally, "Twisterella" peaked at number 36 in the UK in April 1992, and number 15 in Ireland in April 1992.
 
"Twisterella" fared better on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 100.
 
We will next see ride in 1994.
 

 
Bubbling WAY down under:
 
Number 166 "Slash 'N' Burn" by Manic Street Preachers
Peak: number 158
Peak date: 6 July 1992
Weeks on chart: 7 weeks

We last saw Welsh band Manic Street Preachers in 1991.
 
"Slash 'N' Burn" was issued as the third single from the Manics' debut album Generation Terrorists (number 182, April 1992) in Australia, although it was only the second to chart.  "Love's Sweet Exile", released locally in March 1992, failed to chart.  Another single, "You Love Us", was released in the UK, but not Australia, before this one.

Internationally, "Slash 'N' Burn" peaked at number 20 in the UK in March 1992.  Within Australia, the single was most popular in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 140.

We'll next see Manic Street Preachers in August 1992.


 
Number 205 "Colour My Life" by M People
Peak: number 205
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks on chart: 1 week
 
English band M People formed in Manchester in 1990.  Although "Colour My Life" is their first single I have written about, their debut single "How Can I Love You More?" entered the ARIA singles chart at number 174 in February 1992 - but it will not reach its peak until a remixed version of it was released in 1993 (the peak for its original chart run, outside the top 150, is unknown).  Both tracks appear on M People's debut album Northern Soul (number 150, April 1993).
 
"Colour My Life" peaked at number 35 in the UK in March 1992.  In Australia, the single performed strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 186.
 
"Colour My Life" was released in Australia in April 1992 and took nearly two months to spend a solitary week on the chart just outside the top 200.
 
M People's commercial breakthrough in Australia would not come until late 1993, with "Moving on Up" (number 4, January 1994), the second single from the band's second album Elegant Slumming (number 7, February 1994).
 
We shall next see M People in 1993.

 
 
Number 206 "Memories" by Beverley Craven
Peak: number 195
Peak date: 15 June 1992
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks 

Beverley Craven last graced our presence in 1991.  "Memories" was released as the second single in Australia from her debut album Beverley Craven (number 141, July 1991).
 
Internationally, "Memories" peaked at number 68 in the UK in December 1991.  In Australia, "Memories" performed strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 181.

A live performance was used to promote "Memories" as a single, rather than a music video.  The video embedded below is the studio recording of the song.

"Memories" would be Beverley's final charting single in Australia.  She would, however, have one further low-charting charting album with Promise Me: The Best of (number 1062, April 2011).  A third single from Beverley Craven, "Holding On", was released locally in August 1992 but did not chart.



Next week (8 June): Just three new entries, all of which peak within the top 150.

< Previous week: 25 May 1992                                     Next week: 8 June 1992 >

25 May 2024

Week commencing 25 May 1992

Before diving into this week's posts, I wish to pay tribute to regular blog reader Brad Niemann, who suddenly and unexpectedly passed away on 13 May 2024.  Brad is responsible for obtaining about half of the 'bubbling WAY down under' peaks outside the top 150 I include in my blog posts, which is why some of these songs/artists are new to me.  Brad and I crossed paths almost a decade ago, and we shared an interest in low-charting/'flop' singles.  While there was some overlap in our musical tastes, Brad was more into metal/rock than I am (I am generally more into dance/pop/indie), and so our tastes complemented each other.  This blog would showcase a less-diverse range of artists without Brad's input.  He will be greatly missed.
 
I have updated some previous posts with newly-uncovered bubbling WAY down under entries:
 
* 26 June 1989 - two new bubbling WAY down under entries from Etta James; 
* 13 November 1989 - a new bubbling WAY down under entry from Guy Pearce
 
This week in 1992 sees a bunch of new entries for which I can identify no common theme, so let's just dive straight in...
 
Kenny Loggins' hair in 1992 definitely belonged in the "danger zone".
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 114 "Time to Make You Mine" by Lisa Stansfield
Peak: number 114
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks
Weeks on chart: 9 weeks

We last saw English songstress Lisa Stansfield in 1990.
 
"Time to Make You Mine" was the third single lifted from Lisa's second solo album Real Love (number 40, January 1992), following "Change" (number 21, November 1991) and "All Woman" (number 52, March 1992).
 
Internationally, "Time to Make You Mine" peaked at number 14 in the UK, number 33 in Switzerland, number 47 in the Netherlands, and number 47 in the Flanders region of Belgium - all in April 1992.

Domestically, "Time to Make You Mine" performed strongest in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 86.
 
I caught the video for "Time to Make You Mine" once on rage as a new release, before the top 60 chart run started.  That was the only time I heard or saw the song at the time.  I can't place my finger on it, but "Time to Make You Mine" reminds me of another song, musically.
 
We will next see Lisa in July 1992.



Number 120 "Never Look Back" by Maybe Dolls
Peak: number 114
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 8 weeks
Weeks on chart: 11 weeks
 
We saw Australian band The Numbers, formed by siblings Annalisse and Chris Morrow bubble under in 1981.  The pair formed Maybe Dolls in 1991, with Annalisse still on lead vocals.  Maybe Dolls landed two top 40 hits in Australia, with their debut single "Nervous Kid" (number 32, December 1991), and its follow-up  "Cool Jesus" (number 31, March 1992).
 
"Never Look Back" was the third single lifted from the band's debut, and only, album Propaganda (number 25, March 1992).
 
On the state charts, "Never Look Back" was most popular in Western Australia, where it reached number 48.
 
I don't recall hearing this one at the time.  Front woman Annalisse hosted an episode of the iconic Australian music TV show Countdown in 1982, which re-aired during rage retro month a few years back - and it's worth checking out for her general awkwardness in hosting, along with her iconic early 80s hair-do.

We'll see Maybe Dolls one more time, in November 1992.



Number 147 "Everybody Pump" by DJ Power
Peak: number 147
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 1 week
 
I've never heard of this one before, and am listening to it for the first time as I write this post.  My first thought is that the chant during the opening is very similar, if not virtually identical, to that which appears at the start of 2 In a Room's "Wiggle It" (number 3, March 1991).
 
Internationally, "Everybody Pump" peaked at number 46 in the UK in March 1992. 

I can't tell you much else about this one, other than the man behind DJ Power is Italian DJ and producer Stefano Gambarelli.



Bubbling WAY down under:
 
Number 197 "Dragging Me Down" by Inspiral Carpets
Peak: number 197
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks

We last saw English band Inspiral Carpets in 1991.

"Dragging Me Down" was the lead single from their third studio album Revenge of the Goldfish (number 123, June 1993), which debuted on the ARIA albums chart in November 1992, but did not reach its peak until nearly eight months later.

Internationally, "Dragging Me Down" peaked at number 30 in Ireland in February 1992, and number 12 in the UK in March 1992.
 
On the state charts, "Dragging Me Down" performed strongest in Western Australia, where it reached number 158.
 
We'll next see Inspiral Carpets in July 1992.



Number 203 "The Real Thing" by Kenny Loggins
Peak: number 198
Peak date: 13 July 1992
Weeks on chart: 2 weeks
 
American singer Kenny Loggins made his debut on the Australian charts with "Whenever I Call You "Friend"" (number 26, December 1978) in 1978.  Between then and 1986, Kenny racked up six top 100 singles in Australia, with "Footloose" (number 1, May 1984) being the biggest of those, from the Footloose soundtrack (number 2, July 1984).  Kenny scored another soundtrack hit with "Danger Zone" (number 14, September 1986), from the Top Gun soundtrack (number 3, October 1986).  Kenny (and his beard) also made a memorable contribution to USA for Africa's "We Are the World" (number 1, April 1985) - not counted in the tally of Kenny's hits above.

"The Real Thing" was the second single lifted from Kenny's seventh studio album Leap of Faith, which does not appear to have been released in Australia.  It followed the single "Conviction of the Heart", which was released in Australia in December 1991 but failed to chart.

Internationally, "The Real Thing" peaked at number 39 in Canada in April 1992, and number 5 on the meaningless US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart in April 1992.

Within Australia, "The Real Thing" was most popular in Western Australia, where it reached number 162.

Kenny would land one further charting single in Australia, "For the First Time" (number 81, May 1997) - minus beard, from the One Fine Day soundtrack (number 41, April 1997).  He would have two further low-charting albums in Australia: The Essential Kenny Loggins (number 428, September 2005) and Playlist: The Rock 'n' Roll Years, 1979-1988 (number 1064, June 2012).
 


Next week (1 June): Six top 150 entries and three bubbling WAY down under entries.

< Previous week: 18 May 1992                                    Next week: 1 June 1992 >

18 May 2024

Week commencing 18 May 1992

This week in 1992 sees a bumper ten new top 150 entries, with a further three bubbling WAY down under.  A theme running through this week's new entries is that quite a few of them did a bit better, landing within the top 100, on the rival Australian Music Report singles chart.
 
In other news, I have updated some earlier posts (a work in progress...) with newly-uncovered singles peaking outside the top 150, namely:
 
* 13 March 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Glass Tiger;
* 20 March 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from The Smithereens;
* 24 April 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Not Drowning, Waving;
* 8 May 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Amy Grant;
* 5 June 1989 - new bubbling WAY down under entries from Tom Jones, Ten City, Cameo and Keith Richards;
* 13 May 1991 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Shawn Christopher;
* 9 September 1991 - new bubbling WAY down under entry from Peabo Bryson.
 
Jenny Morris landed a break in her hit-run this week in 1992.
 
Top 150 debuts:
 
Number 120 "What a Lover" by Eve
Peak: number 120
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks
 
I wasn't aware of this track at the time, and can't tell you much about it, other than Eve was probably an Australian artist, as only an Australian pressing is listed on discogs.com.  This is the only release listed under that artist on the site.

"What a Lover" performed strongest on the South Australia/Northern Territory state chart, where it reached number 42.  "What a Lover" also peaked higher on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 85.



Number 124 "Don't Lose the Magic" by Shawn Christopher
Peak: number 124
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks
Weeks on chart: 5 weeks

We last saw American house singer Shawn Christopher in 1991.  "Don't Lose the Magic" was her second and final single to chart in Australia.  I didn't know this song at the time, but it was on a various artists music video compilation I recently picked up.  I like it.

Internationally, "Don't Lose the Magic" peaked at number 30 in the UK in March 1992, number 71 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in March 1992, number 27 in the Netherlands in May 1992, and number 30 in the Flanders region of Belgium in June 1992.

Domestically, "Don't Lose the Magic" performed strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 104.

To my ears, "Don't Lose the Magic" has that Steve "Silk" Hurley sound that was popular in 1991-2, though he was not involved in its production.



Number 125 "Crackerjack Man" by Jenny Morris
Peak: number 125
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 3 weeks
Weeks on chart: 8 weeks
 
New Zealand singer Jenny Morris made her first appearance on the Australian chart in 1982 with the single "Puberty Blues" (number 88, February 1982), title track of the Australian film of the same name.  Jenny returned in November 1983 as the lead singer of QED, with the track "Everywhere I Go" (number 19, April 1984); a song I remember vividly from the time, when I was in Grade Prep at school.

Jenny then launched her solo career proper with the single "Get Some Humour" (number 82, February 1986).  Between 1986 and 1992, Jenny amassed seven top 40 singles in Australia, with the highest-peaking of those being "Break in the Weather" (number 2, October 1991).
 
"Crackerjack Man" was the fourth and final single from Jenny's third solo album Honeychild (number 5, October 1991). It followed "Break in the Weather", "I've Had You" (number 39, January 1992), and "Zero" (number 89, March 1992).

On the state charts, "Crackerjack Man" performed strongest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 116.

I don't recall hearing "Crackerjack Man" at the time, but became familiar with it when digitising Jenny's The Best of Jenny Morris: The Story So Far VHS tape in 2005.  I had forgotten how the song went prior to listening to it again when writing this post, though I do like it.

"Crackerjack Man" fared better on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it peaked at number 98.
 
Unfortunately, Jenny has had the neurological voice disorder spasmodic dysphonia for some time, making it difficult for her to speak let alone sing, as it gives the voice a strangled-strained quality, resulting in voice breaks.  I first became aware of spasmodic dysphonia at university, where I studied speech pathology, in the late 1990s.  Coincidentally, that's also where I first heard of BoTox (it can be injected into the vocal cords to treat spasmodic dysphonia, often giving relief for several months before needing to be injected again) - before it became widely known in association with cosmetic procedures, although Jenny has opted not to undergo this treatment when I caught her speaking about the issues she has with speaking/singing on an episode of Australian Story some years ago.

We shall next see Jenny in 1994.



Number 131 "Lift Me Up" by Howard Jones
Peak: number 131
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks
Weeks on chart: 9 weeks

British singer-songwriter Howard Jones, born John Howard Jones, first appeared on the Australian chart with "New Song" (number 60, December 1983) in November 1983. He scored six top 40 hits in Australia between 1984 and 1986, with the biggest of those being "No One Is to Blame" (number 9, June 1986).  Somehow, I wasn't aware of Howard Jones at the time (I didn't start following music properly until 1987), but knew "No One Is to Blame" then, though not who it was by or what the song was called.

Howard was last on the Australian chart in 1989 with the single "Everlasting Love" (number 91, April 1989) and the album Cross That Line (number 97, May 1989).
 
"Lift Me Up" was the lead single from Howard's fifth studio album In the Running (number 158, June 1992).  Internationally, "Lift Me Up" peaked at number 52 in the UK in April 1992, number 6 in Canada in May 1992, and number 32 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in June 1992.

Within Australia, "Lift Me Up" was most popular in South Australia/Northern Territory, where it reached number 106.

We will next see Howard in 1993.



Number 132 "I Drove All Night" by Roy Orbison
Peak: number 132
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 5 weeks (2 weeks in 1992; 3 weeks in 1993)
Weeks on chart: 16 weeks (9 weeks in 1992; 7 weeks in 1993)
 
We last saw Roy Orbison in 1989.

I, like most of the world, first became familiar with the song "I Drove All Night" when Cyndi Lauper released her version of it, reaching number 11 for three weeks on the Austalian chart in July 1989.  The song, however, was originally recorded in 1987 by Roy Orbison, though his version was not released as a single until 1992, more than three years after his death at age 52 in December 1988.  I first heard Roy's rendition of "I Drove All Night" on the UK Chart Attack radio show.
 
"I Drove All Night" was written by Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly, who shared writing credits on hits such as Madonna's "Like a Virgin" (number 1, December 1984), Cyndi Lauper's "True Colors" (number 3, September 1986), Heart's "Alone" (number 6, August 1987), Whitney Houston's "So Emotional" (number 26, February 1988) and Bangles' "Eternal Flame" (number 1, May 1989) to name but a few.

The vocals from Roy's 1987 recording of "I Drove All Night" were used by Jeff Lynne who created a new mix of the track for Roy's posthumous King of Hearts (number 25, November 1992) album.  The track first appeared on the Nintendo: White Knuckle Scorin' album in 1991.

Internationally, Roy's version of "I Drove All Night" peaked at number 52 in Germany in March 1992, number 74 in Canada in May 1992, number 7 in the UK in July 1992, number 6 in Ireland, and number 48 in New Zealand in September 1992.

In Australia, "I Drove All Night" had two separate releases - a cassingle release on BMG in March 1992, and a CD/cassingle release on EMI in March 1993.  The 1992 release contained Sheena Easton's "Forever Friends" and Trixter's "Line of Fire" as B-sides, while the 1993 release contained B-sides from Roy.  The single peaked at number 132 on the ARIA singles chart in May 1992, and at number 140 in March 1993.  "I Drove All Night" performed strongest on the Queensland state chart for both releases, reaching number 87 in May 1992, and number 112 in April 1993.

The music video for "I Drove All Night" features actors Jason Priestley and Jennifer Connelly.

Céline Dion scored a hit with her version of "I Drove All Night" (number 22, March 2003) in 2003, though I prefer the Hex Hector remix of it.

Roy Orbison's recording is my favourite version of "I Drove All Night", though I like Cyndi's version too.  Another version of the song I like was recorded by The Protomen in 2012.  "I Drove All Night" is one of my favourite karaoke songs to sing... when no-one is in the vicinity.

We will next see Roy in November 1992.



Number 136 "Love U Love Me" by Atomic Dining Club
Peak: number 129
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 7 weeks
 
Australian band Atomic Dining Club were Brian Mannix - former lead singer of Uncanny X-Men, Ross McLennon and Steve Harrison.  "Love U Love Me" was their debut single, from their only album Car Crash in Blue, which had three separate release dates listed in The ARIA Report, from May, June and August of 1993.  I am not sure which was the correct release date, or whether the album was even released at all, given that no copies of it are currently listed on discogs.com, and nothing came up when I googled the band name and album title.  Does anyone reading this know whether the album saw the light of day? The album missed the ARIA top 150 albums chart - I can tell you that.

Having not heard this track before, I liked it more than I was expecting to, given that I'm not really a fan of Uncanny X-Men, whose biggest hit was "50 Years" (number 4, June 1985).

"Love U Love Me" found greater success on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 87.
 
A music video exists for "Love U Love Me", as it is listed as a new addition on the rage playlists in The ARIA Report, but nobody has yet uploaded it to YouTube.

We shall see Atomic Dining Club again in 1993.
 


Number 143 "The Big One" by Chris Wilson
Peak: number 143
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 1 week
 
"The Big One" was Australian blues musician Chris Wilson's debut single.  The track was lifted from his debut album Landlocked, which originally peaked at number 120 in Australia in August 1992, but the 30th edition re-issue of the album actually peaked higher, reaching number 86 in December 2022.

I first became aware of Chris in 1995, when he sang the male vocal on Merril Bainbridge's "Under the Water" (number 4, August 1992) - the "I'll be your loverrrr, underrrr the waterrrr" bits.  I spelt the lyric that way in jest, as despite being Australian born and bred, Chris seems to rhotacise his r-coloured vowels - that is, pronounce the 'r' in them, like speakers of American, Canadian and Irish English do.  Australian English is non-rhotic, meaning that we do not pronounce the 'r' in vowel sounds, other than in connected speech where the vowel appears at the end of the word and is followed by another word beginning with a vowel sound, as in the phrase "four of those".  My speech pathology degree comes in handy for other things sometimes...

Chris followed up this track with the single "Alimony Blues" in October 1992, which missed the top 150.

Sadly, Chris passed away in 2019, aged 62, after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

We will next see Chris in 1996, as part of the duo Wilson Diesel.
 


Number 144 "Girl for Me" by The Chevelles
Peak: number 144
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 1 week

Perth band The Chevelles formed in 1989.  The group never landed a top 100 entry, and this was their only release to trouble the top 150.  An earlier EP, The Kids Ain't Hip, curiously spent two weeks at number 8 on the ARIA top 20 Alternative Singles chart in March 1991, before re-appearing on the top 20 Alternative Albums Chart, where it reached number 10 in April 1991.

"Girl for Me" is lifted from The Chevelles' debut album Gigantic, which was released in June 1993.  The single performed better on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 97.



Number 145 "The Way I Made You Feel" by Ed Kuepper
Peak: number 144
Peak date: 25 May 1992
Weeks in top 150: 2 weeks
 
Born in West Germany, but based in Australia, Ed Kuepper was a founding member and guitarist of seminal punk band The Saints, formed in 1973.  The Saints first appeared on the Australian chart with their debut single "(I'm) Stranded" (number 98, March 1977). Ed left the band in 1979, before The Saints scored their biggest hit with "Just Like Fire Would" (number 29, April 1986).

Ed's debut solo album Electrical Storm was released in September 1985, but missed the national top 100.  Ed scored his first charting single with "Nothing Changes in My House" (number 99, January 1988).  His biggest solo 'hit' in Australia was "If I Had a Ticket" (number 72, April 1994).

"The Way I Made You Feel" appeared on Ed's fifth solo studio album Honey Steel's Gold (number 28, March 1992).

We will next see Ed in July 1992.
 

 
Number 147 "Play Dinosaur" by Degenerates
Peak: number 142
Peak date: 1 June 1992
Weeks in top 150: 4 weeks

We last saw Australian band Degenerates in 1991.  "Play Dinosaur" was the title track from the band's debut album Play Dinosaur, which, as with Atomic Dining Club above, had three separate release dates listed in The ARIA Report (June, July and August 1992), and missed the top 150.
 
"Play Dinosaur" performed significantly better on the Australian Music Report singles chart, where it reached number 68.  I have to wonder why a single peaked 74 places higher on the AMR chart...
 
This would be Degenerates' final top 150 entry, though they released a second album Outspoken in March 1993.



Bubbling WAY down under:
 
Number 189 "Bang" by Blur
Peak: number 189
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 1 week
 
We last saw English band Blur in 1991.  "Bang" was the second single released from the band's debut album Leisure (number 142, April 1992) in Australia.

Internationally, "Bang" peaked at number 24 in the UK in August 1991, and number 21 in Ireland in August 1991.  The single also peaked at number 40 on the US Billboard Dance Club songs chart in June 1992 - for what that is worth (not much, in my book).  This was classified as dance music in the US?!

Within Australia, "Bang" performed strongest in Victoria/Tasmania, where it reached number 168.

I don't recall hearing "Bang" before, though have a VHS-sourced copy of the video in my collection from a tape I digitised, so have actually heard it before.  Musically, it sounds quite similar to "There's No Other Way" to me.

"Bang" has been virtually disowned by Blur, who wrote the song in response to pressure they were placed under by their record label to produce another hit.  The band's bass player Alex James said in a 1999 interview that he didn't think the band would ever play the song live again.

We will next see Blur in 1993.
 
 
 
Number 209 "Closer Than Close" by Peabo Bryson
Peak: number 209
Peak date: 18 May 1992
Weeks on chart: 1 week
 
We last saw American singer-songwriter Peabo Bryson in 1991.
 
"Closer Than Close" was issued as the second single from Peabo's fifteenth studio album Can You Stop the Rain (number 188, March 1992).  Interestingly, this single was released in Australia in February 1992, but took just over three months to register on the charts.

"Closer Than Close" missed the US Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number 10 on the pointless Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart in November 1991.

Within Australia, "Closer Than Close" peaked highest in New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory, where it reached number 186.

Peabo would land his final hits in Australia with the duets "Beauty and the Beast" (number 17, July 1992) with Céline Dion, and "A Whole New World (Aladdin's Theme)" (number 10, June 1993) with Regina Belle.  Both tracks were themes from Disney movies, Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin, respectively.

While we won't see Peabo bubbling under again, he had further low-charting albums in Australia with Through the Fire (number 193, August 1994) and Missing You (number 619, October 2007).


 
Number 211 "The Guitar (The Lion Sleeps Tonight)" by They Might Be Giants
Peak: number 180
Peak date: 8 June 1992
Weeks on chart: 3 weeks

We last saw American band They Might Be Giants in March 1992.  "The Guitar (The Lion Sleeps Tonight)" was the second single from their fourth studio album Apollo 18 (number 59, April 1992).
 
"The Guitar (The Lion Sleeps Tonight)" came together in a jam session based around The Tokens' "The Lion Sleeps Tonight". The song's chorus is sung by country singer Laura Cantrell.

I cannot find evidence of "The Guitar..." charting anywhere else.  Within Australia, the single performed strongest in Queensland, where it reached number 156.

We shall next see They Might Be Giants in 1994.



Next week (25 May): A quieter week, with three top 150 entries and two bubbling WAY down under debuts.

< Previous week: 11 May 1992                                         Next week: 25 May 1992 >